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John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2 16 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), Odes (ed. John Conington) 14 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 6 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 6 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 6 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, The fourteen orations against Marcus Antonius (Philippics) (ed. C. D. Yonge) 6 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, Three orations on the Agrarian law, the four against Catiline, the orations for Rabirius, Murena, Sylla, Archias, Flaccus, Scaurus, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 4 0 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 4 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 2 0 Browse Search
Sallust, The Jugurthine War (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Tibur (Italy) or search for Tibur (Italy) in all documents.

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John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 82 (search)
a itself is. Serv. places it in altis montibus Tiburtinis, and Heyne originally identified it with the fall of the sulphurous waters of the Albula into the Anio at Tibur: but Bonstetten thinks he has discovered it in the sulphurous spring of Altieri near the fane of Anna Perenna on the road to Ardea, and his opinion was accepted bLong has no doubt that the Albunea was the sulphur lake (or nymph of the lake) from which issues the canal of the Albula. Virg., he says, has confused the lake and the woods round the lake. The difficulty (he continues) is that the lake is not at Tibur, but at least two Roman miles below the heights of Tibur, where the cascade is. Long has no doubt that the Albunea was the sulphur lake (or nymph of the lake) from which issues the canal of the Albula. Virg., he says, has confused the lake and the woods round the lake. The difficulty (he continues) is that the lake is not at Tibur, but at least two Roman miles below the heights of Tibur, where the cascade is.
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 86 (search)
There were many oracles of this kind in Greece, generally in caves, as that of Trophonius at Lebadea and that of Amphiaraus at Thebes and Oropus. Virg. seems to have transferred the custom to Italy. Heyne remarks that Tiburtus, the founder of Tibur (mentioned below v. 670), was the son of Amphiaraus. This again tends to prove that the oracle mentioned by Virg. was at or near Tibur. Serv. observes that incubare is the proper term for this mode of consultation, answering to e)gkoima=sqai: comp. red the custom to Italy. Heyne remarks that Tiburtus, the founder of Tibur (mentioned below v. 670), was the son of Amphiaraus. This again tends to prove that the oracle mentioned by Virg. was at or near Tibur. Serv. observes that incubare is the proper term for this mode of consultation, answering to e)gkoima=sqai: comp. Plaut. Curc. 2. 2. 16, Cic. Div. 1. 43. Rams were sacrificed, and the worshipper slept in their skins, Pausan. 1. 34 (of Amphiaraus), Strabo 6. p. 284 (of Calchas in Daunia).
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 630 (search)
Tela novant like transtra novant 5. 752. Comp. Hor. 1 Od. 35. 38, O utinam nova Incude diffingas retusum in Massagetas Arabasque ferrum. Atina is apparently regarded by Virg. as a Latin city, though it seems to have been originally Volscian, while historically it was Samnite (Dict. G. s. v.). Tibur is called superbum doubtless with reference to its position, though Serv. fancies there is an allusion to an answer given by the Roman senate on one occasion to a Tiburtine embassy, superbi estis.
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 670-677 (search)
Two brothers, Catillus and Coras, come from Tibur.
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 670 (search)
The story was that Catillus, son of Amphiaraus, settled in Italy, and that his three sons, Tiburtus, Catillus the younger, and Coras, founded Tibur. See Heyne, Excurs. 8 to this Book.