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g Early's forces to the north and west, and took up the line of the Monocacy. Sheridan was given the command of the Federal defense. He soon placed himself in the v column was the Army of the Shenandoah, which soon sent the opposing force, as Sheridan expressed it, whirling through Winchester, annihilated two armies gathered to omas were sent to Wilmington, under Schofield, after the fall of Fort Fisher. Sheridan's troopers were pressed forward up the Shenandoah Valley, to cross over to thehe great campaign, and the grand finale was about to be enacted. As soon as Sheridan reached the Army of the Potomac, his troops were placed on the left of that arA race was begun by the Confederates to get beyond the Army of the Potomac and Sheridan's troopers, to join Johnston, and so possibly to overpower Sherman's army. ShSheridan succeeded in heading Lee off and in forcing him from the railroad, where his supplies were, while parts of the armies of the Potomac and the James followed and
officers Grant brought on from the West were Sheridan and Rawlins. Culpeper Court House, deemi Warren, the Fifth; and Sedgwick, the Sixth. Sheridan was at the head of the cavalry. The Ninth Coord, farther to the east. The cavalry, under Sheridan, was in advance. By night the army, with the Fitzhugh Lee in two separate encounters, but Sheridan was unable to follow up the advantage. He haf staff, General Halleck. During this time Sheridan, who had brought the cavalry The ones who ed two thousand on each side. On the 25th, Sheridan and his cavalry rejoined the army. They had e to try at some other point, and on the 31st Sheridan's cavalry took possession of Cold Harbor. Thsed the river by midnight. On the 31st General Sheridan reached Cold Harbor, which Meade had ordesand troops and Lee about eighty thousand. Sheridan's appearance at Cold Harbor was resented in vo his left and connected with Smith's right. Sheridan was sent to hold the lower Chickahominy bridg[3 more...]
takes all summer, to his chief of staff, General Halleck. During this time Sheridan, who had brought the cavalry The ones who never came back These are some of the army he would draw Stuart after him. Grant at once gave the order, and Sheridan made a detour around Lee's army, engaging and defeating the Confederate cavalrs in these engagements approximated two thousand on each side. On the 25th, Sheridan and his cavalry rejoined the army. They had been gone since the 9th and theirthe James to communicate with General Butler. Grant was highly satisfied with Sheridan's performance. It had been of the greatest assistance to him, as it had drawne whole set in motion for the Pamunkey River at Hanovertown. Two divisions of Sheridan's cavalry and Warren's corps were in advance. Lee lost no time in pursuing hit's purpose. The Union would have to try at some other point, and on the 31st Sheridan's cavalry took possession of Cold Harbor. This was to be the next battlegroun
hind the Sixth; the Fifth was over by noon, while the Ninth, now an integral portion of the Army of the Potomac, passed the river by midnight. On the 31st General Sheridan reached Cold Harbor, which Meade had ordered him to hold at all hazards. This place, probably named after the old home of some English settler, was not a to, and could make no headway against Beauregard with a large one. Grant had now nearly one hundred and fourteen thousand troops and Lee about eighty thousand. Sheridan's appearance at Cold Harbor was resented in vain by Fitzhugh Lee, and the next morning, June 1st, the Sixth Corps arrived, followed by General Smith and ten thouthe Ninth Corps, was placed near Bethesda Church on the road to Mechanicsville, while Warren, with the Fifth, came to his left and connected with Smith's right. Sheridan was sent to hold the lower Chickahominy bridges and to cover the road to White House, Improvised breastworks The End of the Gray Line at Cold Harbor. Here
ic Early. Such a one was found in General Philip Henry Sheridan, whom some have called the Marshalboth armies were darting hither and thither. Sheridan pushed up the Valley and fell back again towam, only to retreat in turn toward Winchester, Sheridan now being pursuer. Both generals were watchienerals had the same plan of battle in mind. Sheridan would strike the Confederate center and rightown's Gap. Here he received reenforcements. Sheridan in the mean time had gone into Camp at Harris latter made memorable by Read's famous poem, Sheridan's ride ), drove Early back to New Market and ginia (Shenandoah) until the concentration of Sheridan's forces compelled his retirement. Then the reak it down were quickly made. Meanwhile, Sheridan was summoned to Washington to consult with Sesounding a reveille to the sleeping troops of Sheridan. The minie balls whizzed and sang through ththither, trying to reassemble the General Philip H. Sheridan in the Shenandoah campaign Two ge[11 more...]
e. He dismissed General Johnston and put another in his place, one who was less strategic and more impulsive. Jefferson Davis did not agree with General Johnston's military judgment, and he seized on the fact that Johnston had so steadily retreated before the Northern army as an excuse for his removal. On the 18th of July, Davis turned the Confederate Army of Tennessee over to General John B. Hood. A graduate of West Point of the class of 1853, a classmate of McPherson, Schofield, and Sheridan, Hood had faithfully served the cause of the South since the opening of the war. He was known as a fighter, and it was believed that he would change the policy of Johnston to one of open battle with Sherman's army. And so it proved. Johnston had lost, since the opening of the campaign at Dalton, about fifteen thousand men, and the army that he now delivered to Hood consisted of about sixty thousand in all. While Hood was no match for Sherman as a strategist, he was not a weakling. H
such tottering walls and roofless homes. Sheridan's operations were characterized not so much, ich was halted only by the superior forces of Sheridan. A West Point graduate and a veteran of the both armies were darting hither and thither. Sheridan pushed up the Valley and fell back again towaenerals had the same plan of battle in mind. Sheridan would strike the Confederate center and rightregiments of Early, aided, in the language of Sheridan, to send them whirling through Winchester. Te were not vigorously opposed, Grant selected Sheridan for the task of clearing the Valley of Confed latter made memorable by Read's famous poem, Sheridan's ride ), drove Early back to New Market and he burning barns and mills. As the army of Sheridan proceeded down the Valley, the undaunted cavasounding a reveille to the sleeping troops of Sheridan. The minie balls whizzed and sang through ththither, trying to reassemble the General Philip H. Sheridan in the Shenandoah campaign Two ge[10 more...]
n these engagements the tide of battle ebbed and flowed through the woods and through thickets of vine and underbrush more impenetrable even than the Wilderness. harassed on every hand. They fell back in every direction. The two divisions became separated and, driven at full speed in front of the Confederate squadrons, became irreparably broken, and when they finally reached the Union lines — the last of them on July 2d--it was in straggling parties in wretched plight. on June 25th, Sheridan returned from his raid on the Virginia Central Railroad. He had encountered Hampton and Fitzhugh Lee at Trevilian Station on June 11th, and turned back after doing great damage to the Railroad. His supply of ammunition did not warrant another engagement. now ensued about five weeks of quiet during which time both generals were strengthening their fortifications. However, the Federals were covertly engaged in an undertaking that was destined to result in a conspicuous failure. While t
n these engagements the tide of battle ebbed and flowed through the woods and through thickets of vine and underbrush more impenetrable even than the Wilderness. harassed on every hand. They fell back in every direction. The two divisions became separated and, driven at full speed in front of the Confederate squadrons, became irreparably broken, and when they finally reached the Union lines — the last of them on July 2d--it was in straggling parties in wretched plight. on June 25th, Sheridan returned from his raid on the Virginia Central Railroad. He had encountered Hampton and Fitzhugh Lee at Trevilian Station on June 11th, and turned back after doing great damage to the Railroad. His supply of ammunition did not warrant another engagement. now ensued about five weeks of quiet during which time both generals were strengthening their fortifications. However, the Federals were covertly engaged in an undertaking that was destined to result in a conspicuous failure. While t
ired Stuart, and later the redoubtable Fitzhugh Lee, and on the Northern side, Sheridan and Pleasonton. For a long time after our Civil War, except as to its politntier service, proved to be a training school in which the methods followed by Sheridan, Stuart, Forrest, and others of their time had been really initiated by their d in April, 1863, and at Brandy Station and Warrenton. Later they accompanied Sheridan on his Richmond raid in May, 1864, in the course of which Stuart met his deathr duty at Yellow Tavern, Trevilian Station, and in the Shenandoah Valley under Sheridan; and they were present at Appomattox. condition. The most brilliant exploitpoint the path of glory to thousands destined to ride under the war-guidons of Sheridan, Stuart, Buford, Pleasonton, Fitzhugh Lee, Stanley, Wilson, Merritt, Gregg, an. The most conspicuous cavalry operations of the war were those of 1864-65: Sheridan's Richmond raid, in which the South lost the brilliant and resourceful Stuart,
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