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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 100 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 90 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 86 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 80 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 58 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 53 5 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 49 1 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 44 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 32 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 32 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for Grand Gulf (Mississippi, United States) or search for Grand Gulf (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.67 (search)
eries; but the attempt was unsuccessful. In the meantime Brigadier-General Bowen was detached with three brigades to Grand Gulf, to construct batteries there; and Major-General Loring, with a similar detachment, was sent to select and fortify a pos rendered unserviceable by the fire of the batteries. General Grant's plan seems to have been to take possession of Grand Gulf, and thence operate against Vicksburg; for Admiral Porter's squadron commenced firing upon the Confederate works early The four divisions of the Thirteenth Corps were ferried to that point during the day of the 30th. General Bowen, at Grand Gulf, observed this, and led parts of his three brigades (five thousand men) to the road from Bruinsburg to Port Gibson, fouretary of War, I said: They cannot be sent from here without giving up Tennessee. On the 3d Bowen's troops abandoned Grand Gulf and returned to Vicksburg. On the same day the Seventeenth Corps joined the Thirteenth at Willow Springs, where the tw
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The defense of Vicksburg. (search)
ted by General Pemberton, and, to a certain extent, provided for by sending General John S. Bowen to occupy and fortify Grand Gulf. I accompanied General Bowen and located the works at Grand Gulf, leaving them in charge of Lieutenant Donnellan, of tGrand Gulf, leaving them in charge of Lieutenant Donnellan, of the Confederate States Engineers. On the night of the 16th of April, 1863, a large part of the upper fleet (then commanded by Admiral David D. Porter), consisting of six gun-boats and several transports, ran the batteries at Vicksburg. Gun-boats hssed down the river, and joined the others at New Carthage, a village in Louisiana about half-way between Vicksburg and Grand Gulf. Here there was a fleet of formidable gun-boats, and transports and barges enough to ferry a large force across the ri were mere diversions, General Grant had perfected his arrangements, attacked and temporarily silenced the batteries of Grand Gulf, and passed that point with his fleet. This was on the 29th of April. On the next day he crossed the river at Bruinsb
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.69 (search)
er this was successfully done. On the 29th, Grand Gulf, the first bluff Funeral on the levee at housand men. My first problem was to capture Grand Gulf to use as a base, and then if possible beat n. This more than doubled the distance from Grand Gulf to the high land back of Bruinsburg. No timour rear. On the way from the junction to Grand Gulf, where the road comes into the one from Vicky, arriving there before daylight. While at Grand Gulf I heard from Banks, who was on the Red Riverof supplying the army with full rations from Grand Gulf. I know it will be impossible without constty at once. On the 6th Sherman arrived at Grand Gulf, and crossed his command that night and the the 14th. A courier carried the dispatch to Grand Gulf, through an unprotected country. Sherman to forward to me. It ordered me to return to Grand Gulf, and to cooperate from there with Banks, agater the battle. The enemy had at Vicksburg, Grand Gulf, Jackson, and on the roads between these pla[15 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Naval operations in the Vicksburg campaign. (search)
s time of any great importance, although those at Grand Gulf inflicted some damage on two of the gun-boats whiwith the river from Vicksburg 25 miles or more to Grand Gulf, and the third the vessels in Red River. Porter ther as occasion required. His first duty lay at Grand Gulf, which was really the southern extremity of the Vwn the river, which resulted in the evacuation of Grand Gulf on the 3d of May. Rear-Admiral Henry Walke wrie commanded the Lafayette: To one approaching Grand Gulf on the river from the northward, six miles above,e at 7:30 A. M. of the 29th, steaming down to the Grand Gulf batteries, the Pittsburgh, Lieutenant W. R. Hoel,ion about noon, and landed about four miles below Grand Gulf, having been struck by shot, shell, grape, and sht had been blockading the river with Battle of Grand Gulf (Second position). the Hartford and Albatross, ademonstration during the attack of April 29-30 on Grand Gulf, which, though conducted with spirit and gallantr
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Union vessels in the Vicksburg operations. (search)
m. W. Gwin (Yazoo River, December, 1862), Lieut.-Com. J. A. Greer (Vicksburg, Grand Gulf), 16 guns; Essex, Com. W. D. Porter, Com. C. H. B. Caldwell (Port Hudson), Cokansas, July 15th, 1862), Lieut. J. M. Murphy (Steele's Bayou, Vicksburg, and Grand Gulf), 13 guns, 1 howitzer; May 15th, 1863, 11 guns; Cincinnati, Lieut.-Com. B. Wi 1862), Lieut.-Com. E. K. Owen (Arkansas Post, Steele's Bayou, Vicksburg, and Grand Gulf), 13 guns, 1 howitzer; Mound City, Com. A. H. Kilty (St. Charles), Lieut.-Comazoo River Raid, Aug., ‘62), Lieut. B. Wilson (Steele's Bayou, Vicksburg, and Grand Gulf, Warrenton), 13 guns, 1 howitzer; May 28, ‘63, 11 guns; July 26, ‘63,13 guns;June 8th, 1863, 6 guns, 2 howitzers; Lafayette, Capt. H. Walke (Vicksburg and Grand Gulf), 6 guns, 4 howitzers; Chillicothe, Lieut.-Com. J. P. Foster (Yazoo Pass), 2 -Com. George Brown, 4 guns; Tuscumbia, Lieut.-Com. J. W. Shirk (Vicksburg and Grand Gulf), 5 guns. Rodgers gun-boats.--Conestoga, Lieut. G. W. Blodgett (St. Charle<
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 6.79 (search)
and an occasional bombardment. The Confederates now rushed the work on their batteries on the river-front, and in a short time the whole ten were completed and about 25 heavy guns mounted. On the way down the river a Confederate battery at Grand Gulf fired about sixty shots at short range at the transports, killing one private and wounding one officer (Captain Chauncey J. Bassett) of the 6th Michigan regiment. The gun-boat Kineo, Lieutenant-Commander Ransom, shelled the town, and General Wions of Everett's; leaving the 21st Indiana, 6th Michigan, the remaining section of Everett's battery, and Magee's troop of cavalry to hold Baton Rouge against a possible attack from Camp Moore, near Tangipahoa. At Ellis's Bluffs, and again at Grand Gulf, troops were landed to drive off the field-batteries that had been firing upon the gun-boats. On the 25th the troops were back at Vicksburg where the bulk of the fleet and sixteen of Commodore Porter's mortar-boats, or bombers, as they were ra