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Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 135 11 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 81 35 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 79 3 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 51 3 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 37 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 29 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 23 13 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 20 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 20 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman .. You can also browse the collection for Pocotaligo (South Carolina, United States) or search for Pocotaligo (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 22 (search)
which carried us some three miles down the river, to the steamer W. W. Coit (I think), on board of which we found General Foster. He had just come from Port Royal, expecting to find Admiral Dahlgren in Ossabaw Sound, and, hearing of the capture of Fort McAllister, he had come up to see me. He described fully the condition of affairs with his own command in South Carolina. He had made several serious efforts to effect a lodgment on the railroad which connects Savannah with Charleston near Pocotaligo, but had not succeeded in reaching the railroad itself, though he had a full division of troops, strongly intrenched, near Broad River, within cannon-range of the railroad. He explained, moreover, that there were at Port Roya. abundant supplies of bread and provisions, as well as of clothing, designed for our use. We still had in our wagons and in camp abundance of meat, but we needed bread, sugar, and coffee, and it was all-important that a route of supply should at once be opened, for
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 23 (search)
y in hand about the head of Broad River, say Pocotaligo, Robertsville, and Coosawhatchie, by the 15te of forage and provisions. Howard to be at Pocotaligo by the 15th January, and Slocum to be at Robto protect the rivers as soon as Howard gets Pocotaligo. W. T. Sherman, Major-General. Therefor-point on the South Carolina side, selecting Pocotaligo and Hardeeville as the points of rendezvous on Beaufort Island, and began his march for Pocotaligo, twenty-five miles inland. They crossed the name. All the country between Beaufort and Pocotaligo was low alluvial land, cut up by an infiniteFebruary; so I determined to go in person to Pocotaligo, and there act as though we were bound for Curing the war. The next morning I rode to Pocotaligo, and thence reconnoitred our entire line dowcampaign. We therefore rested quietly about Pocotaligo, collecting stores and making final preparats some respect for my name, for they gave up Pocotaligo without a fight when they heard that the att[12 more...]
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, Chapter 22: campaign of the Carolinas. February and March, 1866. (search)
this campaign may properly be classed as a continuance of the former. The right wing, less Corse's division, Fifteenth Corps, was grouped at or near Pocotaligo, South Carolina, with its wagons filled with food, ammunition, and forage, all ready to start, and only waiting for the left wing, which was detained by the flood in thoad about Blackville. I spent the night of February 1st at Hickory Hill Post-Office, and that of the 2d at Duck Branch Post-Office, thirty-one miles out from Pocotaligo. On the 3d the Seventeenth Corps was opposite Rivers's Bridge, and the Fifteenth approached Beaufort's Bridge. The Salkiehatchie was still over its banks, andde which defended the passage, and routed it in utter disorder. It was in this attack that General Wager Swayne lost his leg, and he had to be conveyed back to Pocotaligo. Still, the loss of life was very small, in proportion to the advantages gained, for the enemy at once abandoned the whole line of the Salkiehatchie, and the F
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 25 (search)
manded by General Molineux. Leaving to General Gillmore, who was present, and in whose department General Wilson was, to keep up the supplies at Augusta, and to facilitate as far as possible General Wilson's operations inland, I began my return on the 2d of May. We went into Charleston Harbor, passing the ruins of old Forts Moultrie and Sumter without landing. We reached the city of Charleston, which was held by part of the division of General John P. Hatch, the same that we had left at Pocotaligo. We walked the old familiar streets — Broad, King, Meeting, etc.--but desolation and ruin were everywhere. The heart of the city had been burned during the bombardment, and the rebel garrison at the time of its final evacuation had fired the railroad-depots, which fire had spread, and was only subdued by our troops after they had reached the city. I inquired for many of my old friends, but they were dead or gone, and of them all I only saw a part of the family of Mrs. Pettigru. I dou