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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 33 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 24 2 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 16 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 2 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 11 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 9, 1863., [Electronic resource] 9 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 16, 1861., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 6 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for M. Jefferson Thompson or search for M. Jefferson Thompson in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 2: civil and military operations in Missouri. (search)
of the rights of the people. He clothed M. Jeff. Thompson, Thompson, who became a notorious gueThompson, who became a notorious guerrilla chief, like Pillow, seemed fond of issuing proclamations and writing letters, in both of whice day after Reynolds issued his proclamation, Thompson sent forth the following manifesto to the peosolutions is before me, and is signed by M. Jeff. Thompson, B. Newton Hart, Thomas P. Hoy, N. J. Mc officers to be commissioned by Davis, M. Jeff. Thompson. who was also empowered to appoint all llow, who had advanced some troops, and, with Thompson, was preparing to seize Cape Girardeau, Bird'gust 5th, 1861. He informed Hardee that General Thompson, Governor Jackson, and Lieutenant-Governo the commands of General Polk with alacrity. Thompson was under the command of Governor Jackson; anht. Two days afterward, a battery planted by Thompson, at Commerce, was captured by National troopsand, if found guilty, should be shot; M. Jeff. Thompson, already mentioned, and who became the t[2 more...]
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 3: military operations in Missouri and Kentucky. (search)
eutrality flight of secessionists, 76. ex Vice President Breckenridge among the traitors operations of Buckner General Anderson's counter — action, 77. seed of the Army of the Cumberland planted the Confederate forces in Missouri in check Price retreats toward arkansas, 78. Fremont's Army pursues him passage of the Osage Fremont's plans, 79. the charge of Fremont's body-guard at Springfield, 80. Fremont's Army at Springfield success of National troops in Eastern Missouri, 81. Thompson's guerrillas dispersed complaints against Fremont, 82. Fremont succeeded in command by Hunter preparations for a battle, 83. Fremont returns to St. Louis his reception, 84. General Grant in Kentucky, 85. expedition down the Mississippi by land and water Columbus menaced, 86. battle at Belmont Grant hard pressed, but escapes, 87. services of the gun boats the Confederates at Columbus in peril, 88. Zollicoffer's advance in Kentucky the Unionists aroused battle among the Rock C
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 9: events at Nashville, Columbus, New Madrid, Island number10, and Pea Ridge. (search)
y, under Captain Webster, and a company of independent cavalry, under Captain Noleman, encountered the guerrilla chief M. Jeff. Thompson with about two hundred mounted men. These were routed, and pursued with great vigor to Thompson's lines at New MThompson's lines at New Madrid, losing in their flight three pieces of artillery, and throwing away guns and every thing else that might lessen their speed. In the mean time Pope's main column moved on, traversed with the greatest difficulty overflowed miry swamps, The mommander Stembel; Carondelet, commander Walke; Mond City, Commander Kelley; Louisville, Commander Dove; Pittsburg, Lieutenant Thompson; St. Louis, Lieutenant Paulding; and Conestoga (not armored), Lieutenant Blodgett. The mortar-boats were in charg a few men, landed and spiked its guns. That night, at the urgent request of Pope, Foote ordered the Pittsburg, Lieutenant Thompson, to run the blockade. It was done, and she arrived at New Madrid at dawn on the 7th, when Captain Walke went down