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The Daily Dispatch: February 17, 1865., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 23, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 9, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 2 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 2 0 Browse Search
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Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), The Humanities South. (search)
hmond Whig for 10,000 men who are to carry fire and sword into the Free States. Why not add a full suit of chain-mail, a bow with arrows, a tomahawk, a scalping-knife, a lance, a dagger and a sword-cane! This idea of making a traveling arsenal of a soldier, is like a stage-manager's notion of a pirate, who is invariably sent before the audience bending beneath weapons, offensive and defensive. It is an old-fashioned, barbarous conceit quite worthy of a people which has given up its universities and colleges. It is not by any means certain that we shall not have war-paint next; or, perhaps, imitations of those terrific pasteboard dragoons, wherewithal the unfortunate Chinese did not scare away the forces of the British Empire. The number of weapons which the stoutest and most alert soldier can effectively use, even in carrying fire and sword, is limited; and we advise the Ten Thousand to restrict themselves to single blades and a box of friction-matches for each. August 9 1861.
about Three Millions of square miles. Its population, excluding the Aboriginal savages, had increased from Three to more than Thirty Millions. Of its two thousand millions of acres of dry land, about five hundred millions had been divided into farms; leaving three-fourths of its surface as yet unimproved, though but in part unappropriated. Its farms were officially estimated as worth six thousand six hundred and fifty millions of dollars, and were doubtless actually worth not less than Ten Thousand Millions of dollars. On these farms were over eleven hundred millions' worth of live stock, and nearly two hundred and fifty millions' worth of implements and machinery. The value of animals annually slaughtered was returned at over two hundred millions of dollars. The annual product of Wheat was more than one hundred and seventy millions of bushels, with an equal quantity of Oats, and more than eight hundred millions of busels of Indian Corn. Of Tobacco, our annual product was more t
ad the entire canopy. We were forbidden to speak aloud; and, lest the light of a cigar should present a target for an ambushed rifle, we were cautioned not to smoke. Ten miles of weary marching, with frequent halts, as some one of the mundred vehicles of the artillery train, in our center, by a slight deviation, crashed against a tree, wore away the hours to dawn, when we debouched into a magnificent wheat-field, and the smoke-stack of the Galena was in sight. Xenophon's remnant of the Ten Thousand, shouting, The seal the sea! were not more glad than we. Gen. McClellan had reached Malvern the preceding day. Early this morning, leaving Gen. Barnard with directions for posting the troops as they arrived, he had gone down the river on the gunboat Galena from Haxall's, to select a position whereon his retreat should definitively terminate. Jackson's corps, consisting of his own, with Whiting's, D. H. Hill's, and Ewell's divisions, came in the Rebel advance down the Quaker Road, wher
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 17: London again.—characters of judges.—Oxford.—Cambridge— November and December, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
s to prevent his participating in the labors of the bench. He is deeply read, and has his learning at command. His language is not smooth and easy, either in conversation or on the bench; but it is always significant, and to the purpose. In person he is rather short and stout, and with a countenance that seems to me heavy and gross; though I find that many of the bar think of it quite otherwise. I heard Warren Samuel Warren, 1807-1877; author of The Introduction to Law Studies, and Ten Thousand a Year; and member of Parliament for Midhurst, 1856-57.—author of Diary of a Physician, &c.—say that it was one of the loveliest faces he ever looked upon: perhaps he saw and admired the character of the man in his countenance. I have heard many express themselves about him with the greatest fondness. He has a very handsome daughter. Williams John Williams, 1777-1846. He was from his youth distinguished for his excellence in classical studies; assisted Brougham and Denman in the
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, chapter 4 (search)
eneral McClellan, Sumner was under the sad necessity of leaving behind at Savage Station the general hospital, containing twenty-five hundred sick and wounded men. By the morning of the 30th, the army, with all its belongings, had crossed White Oak Swamp, and debouched into the region looking out towards the James; the artillery-parks had gained Malvern Hill, and the van of the army had already reached the river, the sight of which was greeted with something of the joy with which the Ten Thousand, returning from the expedition immortalized by Xenophon, hailed the Sea. The Confederate pursuit was made in two columns. Jackson, with five divisions, pressed on the heels of the retreating army by way of White Oak Swamp; while Longstreet, with a like force, making a detour by the roads skirting the James River, hurried forward with the view to cut off the column from its march. But, so long as the two Confederate columns were thus placed, it is obvious that they were hopelessly sep
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: Maryland's overthrow. (search)
moved up to Harper's Ferry to unite with the rest of the command, and on June 3, 1861. after an absence of ten days from camp, she returned and delivered to her husband the results of her energy, devotion and enthusiasm. The following receipt from the chief of ordnance of Stonewall Jackson's command has probably no parallel in the history of war: Received, Ordnance Department, Harper's Ferry, Va., June 3, 1861, of Mrs. Bradley T. Johnson, Five Hundred Mississippi rifles (cal. 54) Ten Thousand cartridges and Thirty-five Hundred caps. G. N. Cochrane, Master of Ordnance. Such an incident of courage, of heroism, of devotion and of enthusiasm thrilled that army through every rank and fiber. Colonel Jackson, then in command at Harper's Ferry, afterwards the world-famous Stonewall, called on her, with his staff, and thanked her. The officers of the battalion in meeting: Resolved—That the thanks of the Maryland Line be tendered to Mrs. Captain Bradley T. Johnson for her ear
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), New Orleans, Louisana. (search)
e—pre-eminently so in the memorable retreat from the mountains of Tennessee to the border of the Atlantic, and then northward through the Carolinas almost to Virginia. I cannot here undertake to signalize this retreat, except to say it is difficult which most to admire, the prowess and energy of the advance, or the masterly, stragetic defence which retarded that advance and conducted an orderly retreat. It was a retreat which will take its place in future history with that of the famous Ten Thousand under Xenophon from the neighborhood of Babylon along the upper Tigris, through the mountains of Kurdistan and Armenia, to the Greek settlements upon the Euxine. The whole nation stood in solemn silence when the first of these warriors, at an advanced age, breathed his soul into the hands of his Creator. But when the Confederate chieftain, whom we mourn tonight, stood with an ungloved hand beside the bier of his formal rival and foe, performing the last act of earthly friendliness in
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Malvern HillJuly 1, 1862. (search)
Oak Swamp. Huger moved from the Charles City to the Long Bridge road, passing over the battlefield where he was so much needed the day before. Malvern Hill. Thus on the eventful day of July 1, 1862, the Confederate army was stretched along the Willis Church and Long Bridge roads. The enemy, having abandoned their position at Glen Dale during the night, were now safe behind the lines of Fitz-John Porter, who had carefully massed his artillery on the hills around Crew's house. The Ten Thousand, immortalized by Xenophan, did not hail the sea with more delight than did these soldiers, who were only changing their base, welcome the hills that overlooked the historic river on which their gun-boats floated. This position was, perhaps, the strongest occupied by any army during the war. The private soldiers in the Federal army were quick to see this, and, their writers say, remarked on it as they filed into position. The private soldiers on both sides were then taking their first le
The Daily Dispatch: January 9, 1861., [Electronic resource], Incidents of the late earthquake in Maine. (search)
The Montgomery Guard. --This company which, we are happy to say, flourishes well under the command of Captain Dooley, gave their eighth annual Ball, at Mechanics' Institute, last night. We doubt not they had a "gay old time," for every body knows that in their festivals they forget none of the reasonable means of enjoyment. The well known motto, signifying "Ten Thousand Welcomes," was in its usual place over the door, and the interior of the hall was decorated in the most elegant style imaginable. The coat-of-arms of Virginia, interwoven with the old United States flag, adorned the upper end, the orchestra displayed a beautiful array of flags, and the wails were hung with large and handsome paintings. In the windows, muskets and knapsacks were tastefully arranged. We hope the company may continue to exist through many years, and enjoy their happy festival at each recurring anniversary.
eeling sympathy with him on account of recent events, that we feel assured the recruiting will be active, and the General will soon be able to take the field with a strong force. General Floyd, by his forecast, was enabled to see the danger of the South, and by a distribution of arms to the Southern States while he was Secretary of War, he did the South a service it can never repay. Entering the field in defence of the country at an early day after the war began, he gave such evidences of his sagacity, energy, and bravery, that he won the confidence of his army and the people generally. His reappearance in the field will be gladly hailed. Those who desire real active campaigning — such as will perplex, frustrate, and defeat the enemy — can not fail to have it by joining the "Ten Thousand." Whenever it enters the field it will win a bright name in the history of this war. General Floyd is now in this city, and active measures are in progress to enlist and equip his forc
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