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filing off under the bluff, escaped up a ravine. Night coming on, the only means left was to send a regiment around to one of the gaps to cut them off. The Eighth Michigan was accordingly despatched on this business. We lost, singular to say, but one man killed — William West, company C--and two wounded--Joseph Blair and James Hick — all of the same company. West was shot in the forehead by a Minie ball, and fell fighting bravely. The prisoners number about forty; among the number Captain James White, of Maysville. The Eighth Michigan cavalry, which was left on the field, it is expected will capture the greater part of the remainder. The rebel surgeon came in with their wounded and gave himself up; he reported that Pete Everett, the commander, was killed in the charge by company C. About two thousand dollars' worth of property of every description was picked up on the field by our boys. To conclude, I think that guerrillaing has very near played out in this section of the
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 53: operations of the West Gulf Squadron in the latter part of 1864, and in 1865.--joint operations in Mobile Bay by Rear-Admiral Thatcher and General Canby. (search)
harles A. Joullian, Third-Assistant Engineer; J. Fulton, Third-Assistant Engineer; G. W. Nailor, Third-Assistant Engineer; Wm. Fink, Paymaster's Clerk; F. B. Green, Master's Mate; Avery S. Winston, Master's Mate P. N. C. S.; John Curney,----; Jos. M. Walker, Pilot; W. L. Cameron, Paymaster's Clerk; Louis Williams, Engineer; M. L. Shropshire, Acting-First-Assistant Engineer; J. V. Harris, Assistant Surgeon; Benj. Herring, First-Engineer; J. P. Redwood, Clerk; E. W. Johnson. Master's Mate; James White, Master's Mate; Wm. C. Dogger, Engineer; Wm. P. A. Campbell, First Lieutenant; Julian M. Spencer, First-Lieutenant; Jason C. Baker, First-Lieutenant; W. F. Robinson, Second-Lieutenant; Robert F. Freeman, Passed-Assistant Surgeon; G. W. Claiborne, Assistant Surgeon; H. E. McDuffie, Assistant Paymaster; A. N. Bully, Master; W. Youngblood, Chief-Engineer; John L. Rapier, Second-Lieutenant; Wm. Fauntleroy, Second-Assistant Engineer; Geo. J. Weaver, Second-Assistant Engineer; J. Thomas Maybury
John H. Briscoe. Thirty-Second Ohio regiment.--Killed.--Co. G--Private Samuel H. Prior. Co. I--Private William Clarke. Wounded.--Co. F--Privates Abraham Lessy, seriously; John Clarke, seriously. Co. G--Privates Robert J. Hamilton, seriously; Harper Brosens, seriously. Co. H--Private Chas. Prior, seriously. Co. K--Private Thomas B. Hess, seriously. Co. B--Private Isaac Hamilton, slightly. Co. F--First Lieutenant Charles C. Brant, slightly; Private Will Sharpe, slightly. Co. G--Private James White, slightly. Thirteenth Indiana regiment.--Killed.--Co. B--Private William Day. Co. K--Second Lieutenant Joseph P. Jones. Wounded.--Co. A--Private Jas. Miller, slightly. Co. B--Private Matt. Fogen, slightly, left on field. Co. C--Serg't Edward Foster, seriously. Co. E--Sergeants G. L. J. King, slightly; D. J. Kemp, slightly; J. R. Cole, slightly. Privates John Burns, left on field; Col. Song, slightly; George Huid, slightly; Thomas Boyne, slightly; Wm. Shields or Shuly, slight
sixty-five wounded, and seven missing. Amongst those were Lieutenant G. W. Seaford, killed, and Captain P. Moore and Lieutenant W. Ridgeway, wounded, in the Fifty-eighth. Lieutenant William H. Robertson, killed, and Captain John T. Martin, Captain Thomas R. Buckner, and Captain John S. Anderson, and Lieutenant Omohundro, Lieutenant James H. Hughes, wounded, in the Forty-fourth. Captain B. T. Walton, killed, and Lieutenant Lewis Harman, Lieutenant S. Brown, Lieutenant John Hanna, and Lieutenant James White, wounded, in the Fifty-second. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, W. C. Scott, Commanding Brigade. Report of General Taliaferro. headquarters Third brigade, V. D., camp near Port Republic, June 18, 1862. To Major R. L. Dabney, A. A. G.: Major: I have the honor to make a brief report of the operations of my brigade on the eighth and ninth instant. On the morning of the eighth, my camp, on the north side of the Shenandoah, was disturbed by the sound of artille
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Tennessee, (search)
a part of North Carolina, settlers in Washington, Sullivan, and Greene counties meet in convention at Jonesboro, choose John Sevier president, and form a constitution for the State of Frankland......Dec. 14, 1784 Governor Caswell, of North Carolina, pronounces the revolt of Frankland usurpation......April 14, 1785 Constitution for Frankland, or the State of Franklin, accepted by a convention of the people at Greeneville, which chooses John Sevier as governor......Nov. 14, 1785 Capt. James White and James Connor settle on the site of Knoxville......1786 At a conference upon the legality of the State of Frankland it is agreed that the inhabitants are at full liberty and discretion to pay their public taxes to either the State of North Carolina or the State of Frankland ......March 20, 1787 Legislature of Frankland meets for the last time at Greeneville, and government reverts to North Carolina......September, 1787 Deed conveying to the United States territory west of
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), White, James 1737-1815 (search)
White, James 1737-1815 Pioneer; born in Iredell county, N. C., in 1737; served in the Continental army during the Revolutionary War; received his pay in a grant of land from North Carolina which he located in 1787 on the Holston River, near the mouth of the French Broad. He here began a settlement which soon after was made the capital of the Southwest Territory. Under the name of Knoxville it became a thriving town and White acquired a fortune in selling land. In 1796, when Tennessee becry War; received his pay in a grant of land from North Carolina which he located in 1787 on the Holston River, near the mouth of the French Broad. He here began a settlement which soon after was made the capital of the Southwest Territory. Under the name of Knoxville it became a thriving town and White acquired a fortune in selling land. In 1796, when Tennessee became a State, he was elected to its Senate and shortly after was made speaker of that body. He died in Knoxville, Tenn., in 1815.
l, Jr., Daniel E. Jewitt, John R. Campbell, Nathaniel Southard, Arnold Buffum, William Lloyd Garrison. Rhode island John Prentice, George W. Benson. Connecticut Samuel J. May, Alpheus Kingsley, Edwin A. Stillman, Simeon Joselyn, Robert B. Hall. New York Beriah Green. Lewis Tappan, John Rankin, William Green, Jr., Abram T. Cox, William Goodell, Elizur Wright, Jr., Charles W. Denison, John Frost. New Yersey Jonathan Parkhurst, Chalkly Gillinghamm, John McCullough, James White. Pennsylvania Evan Lewis, Edwin A. Altee, Robert Purviss, James McCrummill, Thomas Shipley, Bartholomew Fussell, David Jones, Enoch Mace, John McKim, Anson Vickers, Joseph Loughead, Edward P. Altee, Thomas Whitson, John R. Sleeper, John Sharp, Jr., James Mott. Ohio >Milton Sutliff, Levi Sutliff, John M. Sterling. The writer finds it quite impossible to carry out the idea with which this chapter was begun, which was to furnish a catalogue embracing all active Anti-Slavery w
New Yersey Jonathan Parkhurst, Chalkly Gillinghamm, John McCullough, James White.
201. Thirteenth Amendment, 138; vote on, 143-144. Thompson, Edwin, 205. Thoughts on African Colonization, 129. Thurston, David, 202. Toombs, Robert, 13. Torrey, Charles Turner, 118-119. Townsend, Dr., 205. U Uncle Tom's Cabin, 61, 208. Underground railroad, 121-127; confession of John Smith, 121-127. United States in Far East, 85; Army increase of, 85; Navy increase of, 85. V Van Buren, Martin, 4; a doughface, 4; Free Soiler, 5. Van Zant case, 61. Vickers, Anson, 203. Virginia, 21. W Wade, Benjamin F., 44, 179, 205. Wakefield, Horace P., 202. Walker, Jonathan, branded, 119. Washington, Booker, 136. Watkins, Frances E., 205. Weld, Theodore W., 103, 204. Wheeling, Va., slavery traffic in, 50. Whigs, 2, 5-7, 9. White, James, 203. Whitney, Eli, 31. Whitney, Nathaniel, 205. Whitson, Thomas, 203. Whittier, John G., 202. Wilkes, 179. Winslow, Isaac, 202. Winslow, Nathan, 202. Wise, Henry A., 70. Wright, Elizur, Jr., 203. Wright, Henry C., 205.
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
f exploring the mysterious and fateful canyons by descending through their entire length of a thousand miles in small boats. The same year an uneducated man, James White, was rescued near Callville from a raft on which he had come down the river some distance. His condition was pitiful. He was interviewed by Dr. Parry, who happened to be there with a railway survey party, and Parry told White that he must have come through the Big canyon. White therefore said he had, when assured that he had, although he did not know the topography of the canyons—neither did Dr. Parry, nor any one else. The White story was first told in General Palmer's Report of survWhite therefore said he had, when assured that he had, although he did not know the topography of the canyons—neither did Dr. Parry, nor any one else. The White story was first told in General Palmer's Report of surveys across the Continent in 1867-68 on the 35th and 32nd parallels, etc. (1869). It was repeated in William A. Bell's New Tracks in North America (1869) and quite recently has been republished with notes and comments by Thomas F. Dawson in The Grand Canyon, Doc. 42, Senate, 65th Cong., Ist Sess. (1917). Mr. Dawson, like other
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