hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for Quintius, Sextus Roscius, Quintus Roscius, against Quintus Caecilius, and against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge) 530 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 346 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 224 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 220 0 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 100 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 90 0 Browse Search
Plato, Letters 76 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 60 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 58 0 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Civil War (ed. William Duncan) 42 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien). You can also browse the collection for Sicily (Italy) or search for Sicily (Italy) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 4 document sections:

Pindar, Olympian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Olympian 1 For Hieron of Syracuse Single Horse Race 476 B. C. (search)
ll lordly wealth. But if, my heart, you wish to sing of contests,look no further for any star warmer than the sun, shining by day through the lonely sky, and let us not proclaim any contest greater than Olympia. From there glorious song enfolds the wisdom of poets,On this line see F. J. Nisetich, "Olympian 1.8-11: An Epinician Metaphor," HSCP 79, 1975, 55-68. so that they loudly singthe son of Cronus, when they arrive at the rich and blessed hearth of Hieron, who wields the scepter of law in Sicily of many flocks, reaping every excellence at its peak, and is glorifiedby the choicest music, which we men often play around his hospitable table. Come, take the Dorian lyre down from its peg, if the splendor of Pisa and of Pherenicus placed your mind under the influence of sweetest thoughts,when that horse ran swiftly beside the Alpheus, not needing to be spurred on in the race, and brought victory to his master, the king of Syracuse who delights in horses. His glory shines in the settlement
Pindar, Olympian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Olympian 2 For Theron of Acragas Chariot Race 476 B. C. (search)
gs, rulers of the lyre, what god, what hero, what man shall we celebrate? Indeed, Pisa belongs to Zeus; and Heracles established the Olympic festival, as the finest trophy of battle;and Theron must be proclaimed because of his victorious four-horse chariot, Theron who is just in his regard for guests, and is the bulwark of Acragas, the strength of the city, the choicest bloom of illustrious ancestors, who labored much with their spirits, and won a sacred home by the river, and werethe eye of Sicily; their allotted lifetime attended them, bringing wealth and grace to their inborn excellence. But you, son of Cronus and Rhea, who rule over your home on Olympus, and over the foremost of festivals, and over the ford of Alpheus, be warmed by our songs and graciously preserve their ancestral land for their future generations. When deeds have been accomplished, whether justly or contrary to justice, not even Time the father of all things could undo the outcome. But forgetfulness may come, with
Pindar, Pythian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Pythian 1 For Hieron of Aetna Chariot Race 470 B. C. (search)
g aside the rough spear-point, warms his heart in repose; your shafts charm the minds even of the gods, by virtue of the skill of Leto's son and the deep-bosomed Muses. But those whom Zeus does not love are stunned with terror when they hear the cry of the Pierian Muses, on earth or on the irresistible sea;among them is he who lies in dread Tartarus, that enemy of the gods, Typhon with his hundred heads. Once the famous Cilician cave nurtured him, but now the sea-girt cliffs above Cumae, and Sicily too, lie heavy on his shaggy chest. And the pillar of the sky holds him down,snow-covered Aetna, year-round nurse of bitter frost, from whose inmost caves belch forth the purest streams of unapproachable fire. In the daytime her rivers roll out a fiery flood of smoke, while in the darkness of night the crimson flame hurls rocks down to the deep plain of the sea with a crashing roar.That monster shoots up the most terrible jets of fire; it is a marvellous wonder to see, and a marvel even to h
Pindar, Nemean (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Nemean 1 For Chromius of Aetna Chariot Race ?476 B. C. (search)
grace of Aetnaean Zeus. The chariot of Chromius and Nemea urge me to harness a song of praise for deeds of victory. The foundations of the song have been laid with the gods, and with this man's god-given excellence.The summit of perfect glory is found in good fortune. The Muse loves to remember great contests. Sow some splendor on the island, which Zeus the lord of Olympus gave to Persephone; he nodded assent with his flowing hair, that as the best land on the fruitful earth< he would make Sicily fertile and prosperous in her cities blossoming with wealth. And the son of Cronus sent her a people enamored of bronze-armored battle, horsemen often wedded to the golden leaves of Olympia's olive. I have embarked on the occasion for many themes, without flinging a false word. I have arrived singing of fine deeds at the courtyard gatesof a man who loves guests, where a beautifully arranged meal has been prepared for me, and the halls are often familiar with strangers from other lands. It is