hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Lorin L. Dame 28 2 Browse Search
Hingham (Massachusetts, United States) 28 0 Browse Search
New England (United States) 26 0 Browse Search
Richard Sprague 22 0 Browse Search
Charles Cummings 20 4 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 18 0 Browse Search
Cohasset (Massachusetts, United States) 18 0 Browse Search
Charles Endicott 17 1 Browse Search
William J. Bennett 16 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 16 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 26.. Search the whole document.

Found 52 total hits in 29 results.

1 2 3
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 1
vities in which I had an active part during the many years of its successes. It was the leader in all of the clubs in New England for years. The work of its members ranked high in quality, and many awards came to them in contest and exhibitions throughout New England and the Middle West. On June 4, 1889, a group of camera fiends met at the home of George L. Stone on Ashland street, with a view to forming an organization. Among those present were George E. Davenport, E. E. Sweeney, J. H. ints were made and used for illustrations and lantern slides. Every year the club furnished a set of slides for the New England Lantern Slide Exchange, and for a number of years sent a set of photographs to its various clubs. Two sets of slide also given before the Massachusetts Charitable Mechanics Association and many other societies. Another set was the New England Poets, which was a credit to the members in their individual work and to the club itself. Mr. J. Henry Norcross was
Paul Revere (search for this): chapter 1
, E. E. Sweeney. Outings were arranged to points of historic and picturesque places and largely attended. Local ground was not neglected by the members, and many photographs of Medford's historical points were made and used for illustrations and lantern slides. Every year the club furnished a set of slides for the New England Lantern Slide Exchange, and for a number of years sent a set of photographs to its various clubs. Two sets of slides furnished by the club made it famous. Paul Revere and his Midnight Ride was given its initial showing in the Medford town hall to an audience that taxed its capacity. By special request it was also given in the high school before the students. It was also given before the Massachusetts Charitable Mechanics Association and many other societies. Another set was the New England Poets, which was a credit to the members in their individual work and to the club itself. Mr. J. Henry Norcross was elected the first honorary member (May 3,
J. H. Wheeler (search for this): chapter 1
roughout New England and the Middle West. On June 4, 1889, a group of camera fiends met at the home of George L. Stone on Ashland street, with a view to forming an organization. Among those present were George E. Davenport, E. E. Sweeney, J. H. Wheeler, J. F. Johnson, Charles D. Tucker and George L. Stone of Medford, and Henry S. Fisher and E. L. Jenkins of Everett. The officers elected were: President, George L. Stone; Vice-President, George E. Davenport; Secretary and Treasurer, J. F. , they moved to the ell of the Medford Historical building, corner of Salem and Ashland streets, where they remained until the property was sold and vacated by the society. The Club was incorporated March 17, 1891, the incorporators being: J. H. Wheeler, J. F. Wade, A. E. Boardman, Will C. Eddy, B. D. B. Bourne, E. H. Balcom, C. D. Tucker, George L. Stone, George E. Davenport, E. E. Sweeney. Outings were arranged to points of historic and picturesque places and largely attended. Local gr
E. L. Jenkins (search for this): chapter 1
of the clubs in New England for years. The work of its members ranked high in quality, and many awards came to them in contest and exhibitions throughout New England and the Middle West. On June 4, 1889, a group of camera fiends met at the home of George L. Stone on Ashland street, with a view to forming an organization. Among those present were George E. Davenport, E. E. Sweeney, J. H. Wheeler, J. F. Johnson, Charles D. Tucker and George L. Stone of Medford, and Henry S. Fisher and E. L. Jenkins of Everett. The officers elected were: President, George L. Stone; Vice-President, George E. Davenport; Secretary and Treasurer, J. F. Johnson. On May 6, 1890, they adopted a Constitution Governing the Mystic Camera Club. For some time the club met at the homes of the members, and then occupied the Legion of Honor Hall. Later they met in Odd Fellows Hall. They had quarters in the Riverside block on Main street, adjoining the Medford Art Club, until July 7, 1896, when they move
B. D. B. Bourne (search for this): chapter 1
llows Hall. They had quarters in the Riverside block on Main street, adjoining the Medford Art Club, until July 7, 1896, when they moved to the Pierce block, West Medford. February 1, 1898, they moved to the ell of the Medford Historical building, corner of Salem and Ashland streets, where they remained until the property was sold and vacated by the society. The Club was incorporated March 17, 1891, the incorporators being: J. H. Wheeler, J. F. Wade, A. E. Boardman, Will C. Eddy, B. D. B. Bourne, E. H. Balcom, C. D. Tucker, George L. Stone, George E. Davenport, E. E. Sweeney. Outings were arranged to points of historic and picturesque places and largely attended. Local ground was not neglected by the members, and many photographs of Medford's historical points were made and used for illustrations and lantern slides. Every year the club furnished a set of slides for the New England Lantern Slide Exchange, and for a number of years sent a set of photographs to its various
Henry S. Fisher (search for this): chapter 1
the leader in all of the clubs in New England for years. The work of its members ranked high in quality, and many awards came to them in contest and exhibitions throughout New England and the Middle West. On June 4, 1889, a group of camera fiends met at the home of George L. Stone on Ashland street, with a view to forming an organization. Among those present were George E. Davenport, E. E. Sweeney, J. H. Wheeler, J. F. Johnson, Charles D. Tucker and George L. Stone of Medford, and Henry S. Fisher and E. L. Jenkins of Everett. The officers elected were: President, George L. Stone; Vice-President, George E. Davenport; Secretary and Treasurer, J. F. Johnson. On May 6, 1890, they adopted a Constitution Governing the Mystic Camera Club. For some time the club met at the homes of the members, and then occupied the Legion of Honor Hall. Later they met in Odd Fellows Hall. They had quarters in the Riverside block on Main street, adjoining the Medford Art Club, until July 7, 1
J. Henry Norcross (search for this): chapter 1
s of slides furnished by the club made it famous. Paul Revere and his Midnight Ride was given its initial showing in the Medford town hall to an audience that taxed its capacity. By special request it was also given in the high school before the students. It was also given before the Massachusetts Charitable Mechanics Association and many other societies. Another set was the New England Poets, which was a credit to the members in their individual work and to the club itself. Mr. J. Henry Norcross was elected the first honorary member (May 3, 1892) for his many courtesies. It would not be advisable to occupy space with the personnel of the club (which is possible) but it had members from Greater Boston who were foremost among the amateurs. Although not active now, there is a group of the members who still hold the organization. Commercial developing and printing had its share in putting the camera clubs out of existence. The present officers (hold-overs) are: President
A. E. Boardman (search for this): chapter 1
Hall. Later they met in Odd Fellows Hall. They had quarters in the Riverside block on Main street, adjoining the Medford Art Club, until July 7, 1896, when they moved to the Pierce block, West Medford. February 1, 1898, they moved to the ell of the Medford Historical building, corner of Salem and Ashland streets, where they remained until the property was sold and vacated by the society. The Club was incorporated March 17, 1891, the incorporators being: J. H. Wheeler, J. F. Wade, A. E. Boardman, Will C. Eddy, B. D. B. Bourne, E. H. Balcom, C. D. Tucker, George L. Stone, George E. Davenport, E. E. Sweeney. Outings were arranged to points of historic and picturesque places and largely attended. Local ground was not neglected by the members, and many photographs of Medford's historical points were made and used for illustrations and lantern slides. Every year the club furnished a set of slides for the New England Lantern Slide Exchange, and for a number of years sent a set
Will C. Eddy (search for this): chapter 1
property was sold and vacated by the society. The Club was incorporated March 17, 1891, the incorporators being: J. H. Wheeler, J. F. Wade, A. E. Boardman, Will C. Eddy, B. D. B. Bourne, E. H. Balcom, C. D. Tucker, George L. Stone, George E. Davenport, E. E. Sweeney. Outings were arranged to points of historic and picturesq Wade; VicePresio-dent, L. E. Shattuck (deceased); Secretary, Everett Scammon; Treasurer, Charles A. Clark; Executive Committee, J. F. W. Ames, E. B. Dennison, Will C. Eddy. Arrangements are being made (1923) for a reunion of all the members and past members that it is possible to reach through the mails. Not dead nor gone ties and one that the city may well be proud of. While it has ceased to function, its memories will ever remain with all who were associated together in a work that was agreeable and interesting. Would that more organizations could leave behind them so much that was worth while to the community in which they exist. will C. Eddy.
Charles A. Clark (search for this): chapter 1
ot be advisable to occupy space with the personnel of the club (which is possible) but it had members from Greater Boston who were foremost among the amateurs. Although not active now, there is a group of the members who still hold the organization. Commercial developing and printing had its share in putting the camera clubs out of existence. The present officers (hold-overs) are: President, John F. Wade; VicePresio-dent, L. E. Shattuck (deceased); Secretary, Everett Scammon; Treasurer, Charles A. Clark; Executive Committee, J. F. W. Ames, E. B. Dennison, Will C. Eddy. Arrangements are being made (1923) for a reunion of all the members and past members that it is possible to reach through the mails. Not dead nor gone before, but such, in brief, is the record of one of Medford's organizations that was famous during its activities and one that the city may well be proud of. While it has ceased to function, its memories will ever remain with all who were associated together i
1 2 3