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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: September 5, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 8 total hits in 4 results.

Chesapeake Bay (United States) (search for this): article 7
A marine infernal machine. --An infernal machine, picked up in Chesapeake bay, near Sewell's Point, by the schooner James Steele, on the 10th of August, is on exhibition at No. 12 Leroy Place. It is constructed on the same principle as that illustrated in the weekly pictorial papers a month ago. A stout wooden barrel, well bound with copper hoops and containing 164 pounds of coarse blasting powder, with a percussion cap and spring inside the bunghole, is sunk 16 feet, and fastened in that position, to an ordinary bucy. The bucy was intended to attract vessels, which, when in the right position, were to be blown up by a lurking rebel on share, who could break the cap by pulling a string connecting him with the machine. Captain S. Stilwell discovered this apparatus floating down the stream, and towed it eight miles before, investigating the dangerous character of its sunken part.--N. Y. Tribune
Sewell's Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 7
A marine infernal machine. --An infernal machine, picked up in Chesapeake bay, near Sewell's Point, by the schooner James Steele, on the 10th of August, is on exhibition at No. 12 Leroy Place. It is constructed on the same principle as that illustrated in the weekly pictorial papers a month ago. A stout wooden barrel, well bound with copper hoops and containing 164 pounds of coarse blasting powder, with a percussion cap and spring inside the bunghole, is sunk 16 feet, and fastened in that position, to an ordinary bucy. The bucy was intended to attract vessels, which, when in the right position, were to be blown up by a lurking rebel on share, who could break the cap by pulling a string connecting him with the machine. Captain S. Stilwell discovered this apparatus floating down the stream, and towed it eight miles before, investigating the dangerous character of its sunken part.--N. Y. Tribune
S. Stilwell (search for this): article 7
A marine infernal machine. --An infernal machine, picked up in Chesapeake bay, near Sewell's Point, by the schooner James Steele, on the 10th of August, is on exhibition at No. 12 Leroy Place. It is constructed on the same principle as that illustrated in the weekly pictorial papers a month ago. A stout wooden barrel, well bound with copper hoops and containing 164 pounds of coarse blasting powder, with a percussion cap and spring inside the bunghole, is sunk 16 feet, and fastened in that position, to an ordinary bucy. The bucy was intended to attract vessels, which, when in the right position, were to be blown up by a lurking rebel on share, who could break the cap by pulling a string connecting him with the machine. Captain S. Stilwell discovered this apparatus floating down the stream, and towed it eight miles before, investigating the dangerous character of its sunken part.--N. Y. Tribune
October, 8 AD (search for this): article 7
A marine infernal machine. --An infernal machine, picked up in Chesapeake bay, near Sewell's Point, by the schooner James Steele, on the 10th of August, is on exhibition at No. 12 Leroy Place. It is constructed on the same principle as that illustrated in the weekly pictorial papers a month ago. A stout wooden barrel, well bound with copper hoops and containing 164 pounds of coarse blasting powder, with a percussion cap and spring inside the bunghole, is sunk 16 feet, and fastened in that position, to an ordinary bucy. The bucy was intended to attract vessels, which, when in the right position, were to be blown up by a lurking rebel on share, who could break the cap by pulling a string connecting him with the machine. Captain S. Stilwell discovered this apparatus floating down the stream, and towed it eight miles before, investigating the dangerous character of its sunken part.--N. Y. Tribune