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Carthage (Tunisia) (search for this): book 2, section 1273b
but an inferior person when he has spent money to get elected should not want to. Hence the persons who should be in office are those most capable of holding office. And even if the lawgiver neglected to secure comfortable means for respectable people, it would at all events be better that he should provide for their leisure while in office.And it might also be thought a bad thing for the same person to hold several offices, which is considered a distinction at Carthage. One man one job is the best rule for efficiency, and the lawgiver ought to see that this may be secured, and not appoint the same man to play the flute and make shoes. Hence except in a small city it is more statesmanlike for a larger number to share in the offices and more democratic, for it is fairer to all, as we said, and also functions are performed better and more quickly when separate than by the same people. This is clear in military and naval matters;
even this were not under the control of the populace it would be a mere slave and a foreign enemy´╝ë, whereas he appointed all the offices from the notable and the wealthy, the Five-hundred-bushel classand the Teamsters and a third property-class called the Knighthood; while the fourth class, the Thetes, were admitted to no office.For Solon's classification of the citizens by the annual income of their estates see Aristot. Ath. Pol. 7. Laws were givenPerhaps 664 B.C. by Zaleucus to the EpizephyrianZephyrium, a promontory in S. Italy. Locrians and by CharondasSee 1252b 14. of Catana to his fellow-citizens and to the other Chalcidic citiesColonies from Chalcis in Euboea. on the coasts of Italy and Sicily. Some persons try to connect Zaleucus and Charondas together: they say that Onomacritus first arose as an able lawgiver, and that he was trained in Crete, being a Locrian and travelling there to practise the art
tus first arose as an able lawgiver, and that he was trained in Crete, being a Locrian and travelling there to practise the art of soothsaying, and Thales became his companion, and Lycurgus and Zaleucus were pupils of Thales, and Charondas of Zaleucus; but these stories give too little attention to the dates. Philolaus of Corinth also arose as lawgiver at Thebes. Philolaus belonged by birth to the Bacchiad family; he became the lover of Diocles the winnerIn 728 B.C. at Olympia, but when Diocles quitted the city because of his loathing for the passion of his mother Alcyone, he went away to Thebes, and there they both ended their life. Even now people still show their tombs, in full view of each other and one of them fully open to view in the direction of the Corinthian country but the other one not; for the story goes that they arranged to be buried in this manner, Diocles owing to his hatred for his misfortune secu
rs and a third property-class called the Knighthood; while the fourth class, the Thetes, were admitted to no office.For Solon's classification of the citizens by the annual income of their estates see Aristot. Ath. Pol. 7. Laws were givenPerhaps 664 B.C. by Zaleucus to the EpizephyrianZephyrium, a promontory in S. Italy. Locrians and by CharondasSee 1252b 14. of Catana to his fellow-citizens and to the other Chalcidic citiesColonies from Chalcis in Euboea. on the coasts of Italy and Sicily. Some persons try to connect Zaleucus and Charondas together: they say that Onomacritus first arose as an able lawgiver, and that he was trained in Crete, being a Locrian and travelling there to practise the art of soothsaying, and Thales became his companion, and Lycurgus and Zaleucus were pupils of Thales, and Charondas of Zaleucus; but these stories give too little attention to the dates. Philolaus of Corinth also aro
Knighthood; while the fourth class, the Thetes, were admitted to no office.For Solon's classification of the citizens by the annual income of their estates see Aristot. Ath. Pol. 7. Laws were givenPerhaps 664 B.C. by Zaleucus to the EpizephyrianZephyrium, a promontory in S. Italy. Locrians and by CharondasSee 1252b 14. of Catana to his fellow-citizens and to the other Chalcidic citiesColonies from Chalcis in Euboea. on the coasts of Italy and Sicily. Some persons try to connect Zaleucus and Charondas together: they say that Onomacritus first arose as an able lawgiver, and that he was trained in Crete, being a Locrian and travelling there to practise the art of soothsaying, and Thales became his companion, and Lycurgus and Zaleucus were pupils of Thales, and Charondas of Zaleucus; but these stories give too little attention to the dates. Philolaus of Corinth also arose as lawgiver at Thebes. Philolaus
s see Aristot. Ath. Pol. 7. Laws were givenPerhaps 664 B.C. by Zaleucus to the EpizephyrianZephyrium, a promontory in S. Italy. Locrians and by CharondasSee 1252b 14. of Catana to his fellow-citizens and to the other Chalcidic citiesColonies from Chalcis in Euboea. on the coasts of Italy and Sicily. Some persons try to connect Zaleucus and Charondas together: they say that Onomacritus first arose as an able lawgiver, and that he was trained in Crete, being a Locrian and travelling there to practise the art of soothsaying, and Thales became his companion, and Lycurgus and Zaleucus were pupils of Thales, and Charondas of Zaleucus; but these stories give too little attention to the dates. Philolaus of Corinth also arose as lawgiver at Thebes. Philolaus belonged by birth to the Bacchiad family; he became the lover of Diocles the winnerIn 728 B.C. at Olympia, but when Diocles quitted the city because
all the offices from the notable and the wealthy, the Five-hundred-bushel classand the Teamsters and a third property-class called the Knighthood; while the fourth class, the Thetes, were admitted to no office.For Solon's classification of the citizens by the annual income of their estates see Aristot. Ath. Pol. 7. Laws were givenPerhaps 664 B.C. by Zaleucus to the EpizephyrianZephyrium, a promontory in S. Italy. Locrians and by CharondasSee 1252b 14. of Catana to his fellow-citizens and to the other Chalcidic citiesColonies from Chalcis in Euboea. on the coasts of Italy and Sicily. Some persons try to connect Zaleucus and Charondas together: they say that Onomacritus first arose as an able lawgiver, and that he was trained in Crete, being a Locrian and travelling there to practise the art of soothsaying, and Thales became his companion, and Lycurgus and Zaleucus were pupils of Thales, and Charondas of Zaleucus;
he Teamsters and a third property-class called the Knighthood; while the fourth class, the Thetes, were admitted to no office.For Solon's classification of the citizens by the annual income of their estates see Aristot. Ath. Pol. 7. Laws were givenPerhaps 664 B.C. by Zaleucus to the EpizephyrianZephyrium, a promontory in S. Italy. Locrians and by CharondasSee 1252b 14. of Catana to his fellow-citizens and to the other Chalcidic citiesColonies from Chalcis in Euboea. on the coasts of Italy and Sicily. Some persons try to connect Zaleucus and Charondas together: they say that Onomacritus first arose as an able lawgiver, and that he was trained in Crete, being a Locrian and travelling there to practise the art of soothsaying, and Thales became his companion, and Lycurgus and Zaleucus were pupils of Thales, and Charondas of Zaleucus; but these stories give too little attention to the dates. Philolaus of Corin
ng there to practise the art of soothsaying, and Thales became his companion, and Lycurgus and Zaleucus were pupils of Thales, and Charondas of Zaleucus; but these stories give too little attention to the dates. Philolaus of Corinth also arose as lawgiver at Thebes. Philolaus belonged by birth to the Bacchiad family; he became the lover of Diocles the winnerIn 728 B.C. at Olympia, but when Diocles quitted the city because of his loathing for the passion lcyone, he went away to Thebes, and there they both ended their life. Even now people still show their tombs, in full view of each other and one of them fully open to view in the direction of the Corinthian country but the other one not; for the story goes that they arranged to be buried in this manner, Diocles owing to his hatred for his misfortune securing that the land of Corinth might not be visible from his tomb, and Philolaus that it might be from his.
an able lawgiver, and that he was trained in Crete, being a Locrian and travelling there to practise the art of soothsaying, and Thales became his companion, and Lycurgus and Zaleucus were pupils of Thales, and Charondas of Zaleucus; but these stories give too little attention to the dates. Philolaus of Corinth also arose as lawgiver at Thebes. Philolaus belonged by birth to the Bacchiad family; he became the lover of Diocles the winnerIn 728 B.C. at Olympia, but when Diocles quitted the city because of his loathing for the passion of his mother Alcyone, he went away to Thebes, and there they both ended their life. Even now people still show their tombs, in full view of each other and one of them fully open to view in the direction of the Corinthian country but the other one not; for the story goes that they arranged to be buried in this manner, Diocles owing to his hatred for his misfortune securing that the land
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