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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 40 40 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 8 8 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 4 4 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 4 4 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 35-37 (ed. Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 3 3 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 38-39 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D.) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 2 2 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 2 2 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 40-42 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 35-37 (ed. Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh). You can also browse the collection for 197 BC or search for 197 BC in all documents.

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Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 35 (ed. Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh), chapter 10 (search)
. xvi. 9, etc. and Gnaeus Manlius Volso;He had been praetor in 195 B.C. (XXXIII. xlii. 7). these were the patricians; the plebeians now were Gaius Laelius,Laelius was the most intimate friend of Scipio Africanus. He had entered politics late and had been praetor in 196 B.C. (XXXIII. xxiv. 2). Gnaeus Domitius,He was praetor in 194 B.C. (XXXIV. xlii. 4). Gaius Livius Salinator,Probably, but not certainly, the man mentioned in v. 8 above. and Manius Acilius.He had been plebeian aedile in 197 B.C. (XXXIII. xxv. 2). The circumstantial quality of Livy's details increases our confidence in his accuracy in the account of the campaign. But the eyes of all men were turned upon Quinctius and Cornelius; for both were patricians, contending for one place, and recently-won military glory lent favour to each. But before all else, the brothers of the candidatesAfricanus and Nasica were actually cousins, but Roman nomenclature is sometimes slightly vague on such points. The Flaminini were r
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 35 (ed. Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh), chapter 12 (search)
But neither the Boii nor the Spaniards, with whom war was carried on that year, were so hostile and so dangerous to the Romans as the people of the Aetolians.Livy here turns to the Roman campaigns in the east, and for his annalistic sources he substitutes Polybius. A settlement in Greece had been effected by Flamininus after the defeat of Philip in 197 B.C., but the Aetolians had been from the first dissatisfied with the arrangements (cf. XXXIV. xxiii. 5 ff., etc.), and grasped every opportunity to unsettle the minds of their neighbours. Their activity and its consequences are described in the following chapters. After the evacuation of Greece by the armies they had at first been in hopes that Antiochus would come to occupy masterless EuropeLivy here employs a legal phrase (in vacuam possessionem intrare), used to express the act of taking possession of property which had no real or apparent owner (dominus). Greece had been liberated by the Romans. and that neither PhilipPh
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 35 (ed. Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh), chapter 13 (search)
o attack the Pisidae who dwell around Sida. At that time the Roman commissioners, Publius Sulpicius and Publius Villius, who had been sent to Antiochus, as has already been stated,In XXXIV. lix. 8 the embassy consisted of Sulpicius, Villius and P. Aelius; the last is not mentioned in this Book. Sulpicius and Villius had commanded against Philip and were frequently employed on missions in the east. having been ordered to visit EumenesEumenes had succeeded Attalus as king of Pergamum in 197 B.C. (XXXIII. xxi; xxxiv. 10). Elaea was the port of his capital of Pergamum, which lay inland on higher ground (hence escenderunt). first, came to Elaea; thence they climbed up to Pergamum, where Eumenes' capital was located. Eumenes was anxious for war against Antiochus, believing that a king so much more powerful than himself was a dangerous neighbour, if there was peace, and also that, if war should be provoked, he was no more likely to be a match for the Romans than Philip had been, a