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Springfield, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 107
Doc. 98.-attack on Springfield, Mo. Report of Colonel Crabb. headquarters South-Western District, Mo., Springfield, January 10, 1863. General: Owing to the illness of Gen. Brown, and by headquarters Fourth District, E. M. M., Springfield, January 11, 1863. Colonel: I have the hral, Mo. New-York times account. Springfield, Mo., Monday, January 12, 1863. On Thursdayebels under Marmaduke, attacked the city of Springfield, Mo. A battle was fought in the southern surly Coffee's own regiment. In the batle of Springfield, Marmaduke acted as commander of a divisionille; and thence to make a daring raid upon Springfield, leaving the army of the frontier so far toingfield, before the battle. The city of Springfield, like most towns in the South and West, is f fortification adopted, for the defence of Springfield, the forts are placed as follows: Fort Ned over South-West Missouri. There were in Springfield not more than one thousand five hundred tro[4 more...]
Van Buren, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 107
without a fight; but we shall probably be whipped. At one o'clock the enemy showed themselves upon the prairie south of the town. Without one word of notice to remove the women and children, they opened fire upon the town with solid shot, though they knew that scores of their own friends, both women and prisoners, were exposed to the same danger as our loyal citizens. I had thought that this infamy was reserved for Marmaduke alone; but I learn that Hindman did the same thing at Van Buren, in Arkansas. Gentlemen, said General Brown, who stood on the south-west bastion of Fort No. 4, this is unprecedented; it is barbarous! After several shots from the rebels, our cannon replied, Gen. Brown himself directing the firing. His courage was conspicuous. As the balls whistled close over our heads, the men and even some of the officers would dodge, but the General stood immovable, proudly erect. The fight then opened with some skirmishing of the cavalry. Our cavalry was posted in
Cave Hill (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 107
town, and the enemy was promptly and effectually repulsed. So much the telegraph informed the readers of the Times, several days ago. If steam will do its work as well as lightning, they shall now have a detailed and authentic account of the fight. General Marmaduke, the commander of the rebel forces in this battle, is, I believe, a graduate of West-Point. Next to General Price, he is the most highly esteemed officer, from Missouri, in the confederate army. In the earlier battles of Cave Hill and Prairie Grove, however, in which he commanded a brigade, he was twice defeated. Marmaduke's brigade is composed of the flower of the Missouri rebel troops, and embraces three regiments, which are commanded respectively by Cols. Gordon, Gilkey, and Thomson. The latter was formerly Coffee's own regiment. In the batle of Springfield, Marmaduke acted as commander of a division, including Shelby's brigade, as well as his own, with the St. Louis Legion under Emmet McDonald, and some other
Dubuque (Iowa, United States) (search for this): chapter 107
63. Colonel: I have the honor to submit the following report; On the evening of the seventh inst. Brigadier-General E. B. Brown, commanding South-west department of Missouri, received intelligence from a scouting-party, composed of detachments of the Fourteenth M. S. M. and Seventy-third regiment E. M. M., under command of Captain Burch, that a large force of the enemy, said to be six thousand strong, under command of Gen. Marmaduke, were moving on Lawrence Mill, Taney County, from Dubuque, Ark., with the intention of attacking this place, to capture the depot of arms and stores, and to destroy all communication with the army of the frontier and St. Louis. Immediately orders were despatched by me to Colonel Johnson, Twenty-sixty regiment, Col. Sheppard, Seventy-second regiment, Col. Boyd, Seventy-fourth regiment, E. M. M., to call in all their furloughed men, and concentrate them immediately at this post; also to detached companies in Dade and Lawrence counties. In the cou
Lawrence Mill (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 107
M. M., Springfield, January 11, 1863. Colonel: I have the honor to submit the following report; On the evening of the seventh inst. Brigadier-General E. B. Brown, commanding South-west department of Missouri, received intelligence from a scouting-party, composed of detachments of the Fourteenth M. S. M. and Seventy-third regiment E. M. M., under command of Captain Burch, that a large force of the enemy, said to be six thousand strong, under command of Gen. Marmaduke, were moving on Lawrence Mill, Taney County, from Dubuque, Ark., with the intention of attacking this place, to capture the depot of arms and stores, and to destroy all communication with the army of the frontier and St. Louis. Immediately orders were despatched by me to Colonel Johnson, Twenty-sixty regiment, Col. Sheppard, Seventy-second regiment, Col. Boyd, Seventy-fourth regiment, E. M. M., to call in all their furloughed men, and concentrate them immediately at this post; also to detached companies in Dade an
Iowa (Iowa, United States) (search for this): chapter 107
rd, fought well and faithfully during the entire contest. Companies A, C, F, G, and H, of the Eighteenth Iowa--numbering one hundred and fifty-six men — fought as Iowa boys know how to fight. Their heavy loss and bloody record is proof of their valor. The Quinine brigade (made up of men from Iowa, Illinois, Wisconsin, and otherIowa, Illinois, Wisconsin, and other States) fought like heroes, Spartans, and veterans, as their respective commanders report. All the troops, with a few exceptions, did their duty. I cannot forbear to say that to the vigilance of General Brown, his promptness in preparing to meet the enemy, and to his coolness, courage, and personal supervision of the troops ids, they were rallied, and made a spirited charge upon the enemy, driving them back south of the Fayetteville road, being assisted on their left by a detachment of Iowa troops under Colonel B. Crabb. The enemy succeeded in gaining possession of the college building, a strong position, enabling their sharp-shooters to check our
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 107
the morning of the eighth, about two hundred or three hundred of the enrolled Missouri militia reported for duty. Scouting-parties were sent to the south and south-venth inst. Brigadier-General E. B. Brown, commanding South-west department of Missouri, received intelligence from a scouting-party, composed of detachments of the Fst-Point. Next to General Price, he is the most highly esteemed officer, from Missouri, in the confederate army. In the earlier battles of Cave Hill and Prairie Gro The officers whom I have named, foiled in their previous attempts to enter Missouri, determined to proceed down the Arkansas River to Spadry's Bluff, near Clarksvmilitia, under Generals Brown and Holland, were very much scattered over South-West Missouri. There were in Springfield not more than one thousand five hundred trooeports were brought to General E. B. Brown, commander of the district of South-West Missouri, that five or six thousand rebel cavalry were moving northward from Whit
Fayetteville, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 107
irection of Fort No. 1, taking advantage of the scattered houses to continue tile fight as they retired. After falling back some three hundred yards, they were rallied, and made a spirited charge upon the enemy, driving them back south of the Fayetteville road, being assisted on their left by a detachment of Iowa troops under Colonel B. Crabb. The enemy succeeded in gaining possession of the college building, a strong position, enabling their sharp-shooters to check our further advance until more exposed to our view, in their advance from the south, than they would have been from the east; secondly, because the north and east side of the town were not defended by forts. At the time of the battle the army of the frontier was at Fayetteville, and in that vicinity. The militia, under Generals Brown and Holland, were very much scattered over South-West Missouri. There were in Springfield not more than one thousand five hundred troops capable of service, if indeed there were so man
Arkansas (United States) (search for this): chapter 107
ively by Cols. Gordon, Gilkey, and Thomson. The latter was formerly Coffee's own regiment. In the batle of Springfield, Marmaduke acted as commander of a division, including Shelby's brigade, as well as his own, with the St. Louis Legion under Emmet McDonald, and some other fragmentary squadrons of cavalry. His troops were all cavalry, except one battery of artillery. The officers whom I have named, foiled in their previous attempts to enter Missouri, determined to proceed down the Arkansas River to Spadry's Bluff, near Clarksville; and thence to make a daring raid upon Springfield, leaving the army of the frontier so far to the west as to be ignorant of the movement, until it should be too late to prevent it. The object of this raid was the destruction of the vast quantities of commissary and quartermaster's stores which are here. Had it been as successful in its execution as it was bold in its conception, the army of the frontier would have been reduced to terrible straits, an
Lawrence County, Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 107
ney County, from Dubuque, Ark., with the intention of attacking this place, to capture the depot of arms and stores, and to destroy all communication with the army of the frontier and St. Louis. Immediately orders were despatched by me to Colonel Johnson, Twenty-sixty regiment, Col. Sheppard, Seventy-second regiment, Col. Boyd, Seventy-fourth regiment, E. M. M., to call in all their furloughed men, and concentrate them immediately at this post; also to detached companies in Dade and Lawrence counties. In the course of the night information was received confirming the report of the enemy's advance. At daylight on the eighth, the troops stationed at Ozark arrived, reporting the enemy had arrived and burned their post; and by ten o'clock A. M., our pickets were attacked, and he appeared on the edge of the prairie, south-cast of town. The enemy at once planted his battery, and commenced firing upon the town and Fort No. 4, commanding the approach from the south, while the cavalr
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