hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Matthew Cradock 111 1 Browse Search
Salem (Massachusetts, United States) 36 0 Browse Search
John Winthrop 30 0 Browse Search
Isaac Royall 29 7 Browse Search
James Madison Usher 26 0 Browse Search
Moses Mann 26 0 Browse Search
New England (United States) 20 0 Browse Search
John Endicott 15 1 Browse Search
Moses Whitcher Mann 12 0 Browse Search
Artemas Poole 12 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 29.. Search the whole document.

Found 338 total hits in 104 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Billerica (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
use, but probably to his second, or possibly his third, wife, Prudence by name. In this case the stepson and his family in one half, were cautioned from infringing on the new wife's share, and perhaps a young wife, in the other half. Probably the fourteen children never lived in the house together as they were thirty years apart from oldest to youngest, and the oldest were married and out of the house. This same method of division I know was in another old home—the Manning homestead at Billerica. To revert a moment from hard facts to my creative imagination, in its proper limits, that old house must have been very charming when new, with its view from its knoll by the road south over the flooded marshes or the winding river, with Wellington and its old house and one or two other houses lying to the east; behind, the ploughed land and the wood lots, and westward the little settlement of Medford. Undoubtedly there was work in the clay pits close by the house, and a subdued hamme
New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
sentative lo the General Court. At all events, father or son built the new brick house, and Captain Peter was probably the first to dwell in it, somewhere between 1677 and 1680. I like to think that perhaps he took there his first bride, Elizabeth, in 1670, and that there was born in 1676 Anna, the first birth recorded on the extant Medford records. At all events, it must have been standing ready for his high-born second wife, Mary Cotton, who came in 1684 to him with the blood of two New Hampshire governors and a poetess in her veins, for she was granddaughter of Ann Dudley, the poetess. Her father had the splendid name of the Reverend Seaborn Cotton, and belonged undoubtedly to that distinguished family of ministers. The first son by this marriage was named Cotton Tufts, a son who died too soon to suffer jest upon his name. Another child who was to mean much to the later history of Medford was Simon Tufts, graduated at Harvard in 1724, the first physician of Medford. It was D
Mount Vernon, Knox County, Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
n westward along the river from High street to the weirs, or the narrows, where the Mystic ponds pour into the narrow river and where the Indians had their rude nets for fishing. The hill behind the Centre school sloped abruptly to the river, leaving a little sandy beach at the margin. Behind were the forests, except where the land had been cleared and where a park had been impaled for Master Cradock's cattle, until he can store it with deer. One is reminded that Washington had deer at Mount Vernon, and Cradock must have thought perhaps of the English country parks. Near the center of the present Medford square was a little pond, large enough for ducks to take shelter in passing. What manner of houses would be built by these first settlers? Our modern historians answer quite conclusively, wood. Bricks were made in the colonies at an early date, and we find Winthrop building himself a stone house, and though it apparently was not built on sand, yet a storm arose, and as the sto
Mystick River (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
sh called John Sagamore, was their chief, and a man naturally of a gentle and good disposition. . . . They found it was a neck of land, generally full of stately timber, as was the main and the land lying on the east side of the river, called Mystick River, from the farm Mr. Cradock's servants had planted called Mystick, which river led up into; and indeed generally all the country round about was an uncouth wilderness, full of timber. So Medford was already inhabited in 1629. These men return myself when the alewives in early spring darted up Meetinghouse brook. By a grant of the Court, also, all the land betwixt the lands of Mr. Nowell & Mr. Wilson on the East, and the partition betwixt Mystic ponds on the west, bounded with the Mystic river on the south and the rocks on the north is granted to Mr. Matthew Cradock merchant to enjoy to him and his heirs forever. In 1636, the indefiniteness of the rocks on the north was changed to read, a mile into the country from the river side i
Elizabeth City (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
in all, it is still a house of exceptional charm within. The seven great fireplaces are a marvel to our modern eyes. Mr. Mann took his yardstick and measured the great one in the southwest room. The inside measurements were five feet, five inches in length, three feet in depth, and four feet, five inches in height. There was a curious little oven in it which Mr. Mann had never seen, and which therefore must be peculiar, and the corners were both rounded in the inside. I think Mary or Elizabeth suggested that to the Captain. In both the rear northern rooms were kitchen fireplaces, with brick ovens and cranes, so that both families could cook independently. I was interested in a neat panelled wood closet built in close to the front chimney, which must have been filled with wood every morning by one of the ten boys. There were also great iron S's on the exterior which pierced the wall and were bolted on the great main beams (shackles, Mr. Mann called them), to keep the brick wal
Watertown (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
great cause to acknowledge God's goodness & mercy to me in inabling me to undergoe what I have & doe suffer by New England, & . . . if my heart deceyve me not, I joye more in the expectation of that good shall come to others there when I shall be dead and gone then I greyve for my owne losses, though they have beene verry heavey & greate. So much for Matthew Cradock, the founder and patron of Meadford, whose interests in the new colony also stretched from Marblehead to Shaweshynne and Watertown. And so far, I have touched only on what he probably built; and left still unsettled the question of the Peter Tufts house—where the heretics and vandals aforesaid began their devastating work. After the death of Cradock, in 1641, the little colony languished. The support of the early governor was withdrawn, and as the land was largely in control of nonresident owners, the burdens of taxation were difficult. There was nothing resembling a town government. But after the death of Crad
Puritan (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ny and one third for the governor. These letters show that Governor Cradock, anxious for a good trading adventure in skins, fish and curious other exports, was eager to encourage ship-building. While Cradock was thus planning carefully ahead for the success of his trading corporation, affairs in England took a more serious turn. Parliament had been dissolved and the Puritans saw before them a period of oppression. New England became desirable more as a refuge than a trading post, and Puritan leaders were anxious to inhabit this grant of land. They were unwilling to go, however, if the control still remained in England. One sees already the same spirit which made our Medford men a century later refuse to be ruled by hands across the sea. So the company signed an agreement with the Puritan leaders, Winthrop, Dudley and Saltonstall, by which the latter agreed to transport themselves and families to Massachusetts, provided the charter went with them. By this arrangement Cradock
Meetinghouse Brook (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
use, and probably the part of the old house at the corner of High street and Hastings lane, the Deacon Bradshaw house, are only houses standing today that were standing in 1690. Medford was practically a private plantation owned by two men, Cradock on the north and Winthrop on the south. By the General Court both had access to the weirs at Mystic lakes, where vast quantities of smelts and alewives swarmed in season. I can remember myself when the alewives in early spring darted up Meetinghouse brook. By a grant of the Court, also, all the land betwixt the lands of Mr. Nowell & Mr. Wilson on the East, and the partition betwixt Mystic ponds on the west, bounded with the Mystic river on the south and the rocks on the north is granted to Mr. Matthew Cradock merchant to enjoy to him and his heirs forever. In 1636, the indefiniteness of the rocks on the north was changed to read, a mile into the country from the river side in all places. If Cradock owned practically all of Medford
Marblehead (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
his death, writing: I have great cause to acknowledge God's goodness & mercy to me in inabling me to undergoe what I have & doe suffer by New England, & . . . if my heart deceyve me not, I joye more in the expectation of that good shall come to others there when I shall be dead and gone then I greyve for my owne losses, though they have beene verry heavey & greate. So much for Matthew Cradock, the founder and patron of Meadford, whose interests in the new colony also stretched from Marblehead to Shaweshynne and Watertown. And so far, I have touched only on what he probably built; and left still unsettled the question of the Peter Tufts house—where the heretics and vandals aforesaid began their devastating work. After the death of Cradock, in 1641, the little colony languished. The support of the early governor was withdrawn, and as the land was largely in control of nonresident owners, the burdens of taxation were difficult. There was nothing resembling a town government.
Medford (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
part of this land, under the doctrine apparently, that, a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush. There is reason to believe, says Mr. Mann, that the farm at Mystic was planted in order to carry out this suggestion. As the General Court never granted any land in Medford to any man except Cradock, all settlers in Medford musts is, of course, another assumption, based on probability rather than proof, but the account of Sprague's and the letter of Cradock do establish the settlement at Mystic earlier than 1630 and the launching of boats in the colony earlier than the Blessing of the Bay. That the company, through Cradock, knew in February, 1629, of dford was practically a private plantation owned by two men, Cradock on the north and Winthrop on the south. By the General Court both had access to the weirs at Mystic lakes, where vast quantities of smelts and alewives swarmed in season. I can remember myself when the alewives in early spring darted up Meetinghouse brook. By
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...