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Browsing named entities in An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps..

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Elijah White (search for this): chapter 12
d escaped from. the hospitals, knocked over the doctors and parsons who tried to prevent them, and marched out to participate in the fight, and now fell into rank with great good humor! As many more had left the hospitals in the morning contrary to orders, and not knowing the whereabouts of their respective regiments, had directed their steps to the line of fire, and fought manfully. As we ran towards the scene of battle, the roar of the enemy's musketry and cannon was deafening. Lige White, who had been very active all day, rode up to us and confirmed the statement that our small force was nearly surrounded: he knew every inch of the ground perfectly, and piloted us into a position immediately in front of the enemy's centre. The enemy did not expect us in that direction, and a lull in the firing immediately ensued. Our fatigued comrades seemed with one accord to leave the battle entirely to as; and we did not disappoint their flattering expectations. Advancing through the w
Elijah White (search for this): chapter 31
t their vengeance seemed insatiable, while an enemy remained in sight. But the most singular incident of the day was Fremont's behavior. Hearing that we had crossed to the east side of the river, and were thrashing Shields's command, he formed his division and marched from Harrisonburgh towards the scene, and finding the bridge gone, began shelling across in all directions; this he continued doing for several hours, so that many who were burying the enemy's dead were killed or maimed. White flags were displayed, but this heroic gentleman would not respect our labors, but continued firing without intermission long after the fight had closed! How very valiant this was! General Patterson, in a recent speech at Philadelphia, gave Fremont's character in brief. He declared that he was a statesman without a speech, a soldier without a battle, and a millionaire with nary red. He could only abbreviate the description by calling him an unmitigated humbug. His staff usually compri
Elijah White (search for this): chapter 43
pidly upon Winchester, and accounts came in of several severe skirmishes with the Federals under White, who was said to be falling back upon Harper's Ferry, where General Miles commanded with thirteehis information was given with much secrecy; but I could scarcely credit the idea that Miles and White were such blockheads as not to be aware of the fact that forces were thus secretly massing in di Reports having reached him on the eleventh, while on the banks of the Monocacy, that Miles and White were strongly fortified at Harper's Ferry, and that the Confederates had made no, demonstrations been designed for no other purpose than to occupy the roads and delay McClellan until Miles and White had surrendered. While the shrewd and calculating Hill was deceiving McClellan's advance, Jaumn still proceeded onwards, our cavalry advance having a few hours before handsomely driven Colonel White and the Federal cavalry from Martinsburgh, where many useful stores were discovered and appr
Robert Wheat (search for this): chapter 6
elop more fully the enemy's plan of battle. The reader must picture to himself Wheat's immortal battalion (the Louisiana) and a few other troops still engaged withriver — to Stone Bridge, his object being to disperse the little force under Major Wheat, and allow Tyler's division to cross. Heintzelman was, in some degree, baffrear, leaving sufficient force at the bridge to occupy our small force under Major Wheat. On the left the fight up to this time had been desperate. The attack oof the opposing artillery made fearful havoc. It will be remembered that Major Wheat's Louisiana battalion were left sole defenders of the bridge itself. Althou Stone Bridge, and crossed a few hundred yards higher up, as related above; and Wheat was sent to prevent their junction with the other forces on the same side. As the majority of Wheat's command were Louisiana Irish, they robbed the dead of their whisky, and were in high spirits when ordered to assail Sherman and Keyes. They
Robert Wheat (search for this): chapter 35
he Texan brigade brought into action McClellan's infantry charge defeat of his right wing and centre the field of battle capture of guns and booty death of Major Wheat Confederates in striped pantaloons. Hogan's residence, Lee's temporary quarters, was not far from the river, and I could distinctly see our batteries and trthoughtful, lingered by the camp-fires and talked of the incidents of battle. Among the many who perished on this occasion, none was more regretted than Major Robert Wheat, who had gloriously fallen while charging at the head of his Louisiana Battalion. All regretted the death of this valiant soldier, and many a stout heart was wrung with anguish when it was whispered: Poor Wheat is gone! Bury me on the battle-field, boys! said he, expiring beneath a majestic oak, surrounded by his weather-beaten Spartan heroes-the field is ours, as usual, my boys-bury me on the battle-field! He was interred beneath the lonely, wide-spreading oak, where he had falle
Oliver Wendell (search for this): chapter 13
h the story was truthfully told by the New-York Times and Tribune, the whole North was thrown into consternation and mourning over the massacre, as they termed it, and began reviling each other for urging McClellan to advance at all against Richmond. Massachusetts was particularly affected by the direful news, for two of its pet regiments (the Fifteenth and Twenty-third) had suffered fearfully, and many young men of the first families had fallen, including the promising son of the poet, Oliver Wendell Holmes, most of the men having been enrolled in Boston and Worcester. New-York also felt very much humbled on account of the decimation of the Forty-fourth, one of its crack regiments, which boasted of more professional pugilists and blackguards than any other from that State, except the red-legged Fire Zouaves. Pennsylvania was in mourning for the rout of the First California Regiment, (fifteen companies strong,) which had been raised by Baker in Philadelphia, and which was petted an
Fletcher Webster (search for this): chapter 42
tyranny over the inhabitants, and so many instances of petty revenge. Such a fortune, however, did not fall to our lot, for John Pope, the self-created hero, took great pains to keep from the front, and never allowed himself to ride within two miles of the actual battle. Several of the Federal generals, however, chiefly brigadiers, boldly rode to the front, and cheered on their men. Sickles and Meagher were singled out and disabled. Among hundreds of line officers who fell was Colonel Fletcher Webster, Twelfth Massachusetts Volunteers, eldest and sole surviving son of the great American orator and statesman, Hon. Daniel Webster, of Massachusetts. Wherever I rode along our extended and ever-changing front, prisoners of all grades, cannon, flags, and other trophies were passing to the rear; while every patch of timber was converted into a temporary hospital, where surgeons in blood-stained garments were busily plying the knife. Moans, groans, and death-cries arose on every hand, m
Daniel Webster (search for this): chapter 42
ope, the self-created hero, took great pains to keep from the front, and never allowed himself to ride within two miles of the actual battle. Several of the Federal generals, however, chiefly brigadiers, boldly rode to the front, and cheered on their men. Sickles and Meagher were singled out and disabled. Among hundreds of line officers who fell was Colonel Fletcher Webster, Twelfth Massachusetts Volunteers, eldest and sole surviving son of the great American orator and statesman, Hon. Daniel Webster, of Massachusetts. Wherever I rode along our extended and ever-changing front, prisoners of all grades, cannon, flags, and other trophies were passing to the rear; while every patch of timber was converted into a temporary hospital, where surgeons in blood-stained garments were busily plying the knife. Moans, groans, and death-cries arose on every hand, mingling with the distant roar and rush of battle; while the wounded, both friend and foe, forgetful of all enmity, dragged themselv
on or arms, but every thing worth attention was carried off. Although the enemy claim to have captured thousands of arms and dozens of cannon, I need not add that this, for the most part, was all imagination. McClellan's loss has been placed at twelve thousand killed, wounded, and missing; and I think the estimate below reality. Among his killed were Generals Mansfield, Richardson, Hartsuff, and others; and among a fearful list of generals wounded were Sumner, Hooker, Meagher, Duryea, Max Weber, Dana, Sedgwick, French, Ricketts, Rodman, and others. It is almost unnecessary for me to say that McClellan claimed this battle as a great victory for the Union cause, but did not do so until fully assured of our retreat into Virginia. Why his boastful despatch to Washington was not penned before our retreat from Sharpsburgh is evidence sufficient to show that he still feared, and would not shout until he was out of the woods. In truth, the Northern press acknowledged that with an i
to him through these Headquarters. Upon this order being read to him, the said Keller requested that so much of it as associated him with that woman might be recalled, which request was, therefore, reduced to writing by him, as follows: New-Orleans, June 30th, 1862. Mr. Keller desires that a part of the sentence which refers to the communication with Mrs. Phillips be stricken out, as he does not wish to have communication with Mrs. Phillips. (Signed) F. Keller. Witness: D. Waters. Said request seeming to the Commanding General to be reasonable, so much of said orders is revoked, and the remainder will be executed.-By order of Major-General Butler. R. S. Davis, Captain and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General. The truth is, that Mr. Keller was informed by the soldiers that the Mrs. Phillips on the Island was a prostitute; and as he knew. there was an infamous character of the same name, he declined all communication with her. Having discovered his mistak
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