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Chorus
And let no murderous havoc come upon [680] the realm to ravage it, by arming Ares—foe to the dance and lute, parent of tears—and the shout of civil strife. [685] And may the joyless swarm of diseases settle far from the heads of the inhabitants, and to all the young people may Lyceus1be graciously disposed.

1 The epithet Lyceus, often applied to Apollo, was commonly connected with the belief that he was the destroyer and protector of wolves (λύκοι). As a destructive power he is invoked to ward off enemies (Aesch. Seven 145); as an averter of evil he protects herds, flocks, and the young. According to Pausanias (Paus. 2.19.3) Danaus established a sanctuary in honor of Lyceus at Argos, where, in later times, the most famous of all Apollo's temples was consecrated to him under the title of “Wolf-god.”

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  • Cross-references in notes from this page (2):
    • Aeschylus, Seven Against Thebes, 145
    • Pausanias, Description of Greece, 2.19.3
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