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[142] If that was the object, I confess that I erred in being anxious for their success. I admit that I was mad in espousing their party, although I espoused it, O judges, without taking up arms. But if the victory of the nobles ought to be an ornament and an advantage to the republic and the Roman people, then, too, my speech ought to be very acceptable to every virtuous and noble man. But if there be any one who thinks that he and his cause is injured when Chrysogonus is found fault with, he does not understand his cause, I may almost say he does not know himself. For the cause will be rendered more splendid by resisting every worthless man. The worthless favourers of Chrysogonus, who think that his cause and theirs are identical, are injured themselves by separating themselves from such splendour.


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  • Commentary references to this page (2):
    • E. H. Donkin, Cicero Pro Roscio Amerino , Edited, after Karl Halm., XLVII
    • E. H. Donkin, Cicero Pro Roscio Amerino , Edited, after Karl Halm., XLVIII
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