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[43] What do you say, Erucius? Did Sextus Roscius entrust so many farms, and such fine and productive ones to his son to cultivate and manage, for the sake of getting rid of and punishing him? What can this mean? Do not fathers of families who have children, particularly men of that class of municipalities in the country, do they not think it a most desirable thing for them that their sons should attend in a great degree to their domestic affairs, and should devote much of their labour and attention to cultivating their farms?


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  • Commentary references to this page (1):
    • E. H. Donkin, Cicero Pro Roscio Amerino , Edited, after Karl Halm., VII
  • Cross-references to this page (2):
    • A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities (1890), PROSCRI┬┤PTIO
    • A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities (1890), SECTIO
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (1):
    • Lewis & Short, dum
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