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[41] Let us return again to the same point, and ask what vices existed in this his only son of such importance as to make him incur the displeasure of his father. But it is notorious he had no vices. His father then was mad to bate him whom he had begotten, without any cause. But he was the most reasonable and sensible of men. This, then, is evident, that, if the father was not crazy, nor his son profligate, the father had no cause for displeasure, nor the son for crime.

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load focus Notes (J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge)
load focus Latin (Albert Clark, Albert Curtis Clark, 1908)
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  • Commentary references to this page (1):
    • E. H. Donkin, Cicero Pro Roscio Amerino , Edited, after Karl Halm., XXXIV
  • Cross-references to this page (1):
    • A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities (1890), PAEDAGO´GUS
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