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“Let us, therefore, present ourselves before1 our ruler's headquarters yonder, as Cyrus bids; let us devote ourselves to those pursuits by which we shall best be able to hold fast to that which we ought, and let us offer ourselves for whatever service Cyrus may need us for. And this trust will not be abused, for we may be sure that Cyrus will never be able to find anything in which he can employ us for his own advantage and not equally for ours; for we have common interests and we have common enemies.”

1 Duty of attendance at court

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  • Cross-references to this page (2):
    • Herbert Weir Smyth, A Greek Grammar for Colleges, NEGATIVE SENTENCES
    • William Watson Goodwin, Syntax of the Moods and Tenses of the Greek Verb, Chapter IV
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