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lous accounts, are given by the Armenian historians. II. SEVEN GOVERNORS Seven governors appointed by Alexander, and after his death by the Seleucidae, during the period from 328 to 149 B. C. III. DYNASTY OF THE ARSACIDAE From B. C. 149 to A. D. 428. See below. IV. PERSIAN GOVERNORS From A. D. 428 to 625. V. GREEK AND ARABIAN GOVERNORS from A. D. 632 to 855. VI. DYNASTY OF THE PAGRATIDAE from 855 to 1079. The Pagratidae, a noble family of Jewish origin, settled in Armenia in B. C. 600, according to the Armenian historians. They were one of the most powerful families in Armenia. After they had come to the throne, they sometimes were compelled to pay tribute to the khalifs and to the emperors of Constantinople, and in later times they lost a considerable part of Armenia. A branch of this family reigned at Kars for a considerable time after 1079. Another branch acquired the kingdom of Georgia, which it possessed down to the present day, when the last king, David, ceded his
igranes, who reigned at Edessa, and whose descendants became masters of Armenia Magna after the extinction of the Arsacidae in that country with the death of Tiridates I., who was established on the throne by Nero, and who died most probably in A. D. 62. The Armenian historians have treated with particular attention the history of the younger branch; they speak but little about the earlier transactions with Rome; and they are almost silent with regard to those kings, the offspring of the kings . Zeno of Pontus, surnamed Artaxias.--... Tigranes IV., son of Alexander Herodes.--A. D. 35. Arsaces II. --A. D. 35. Mithridates of Iberia.--A. D. 51. Rhadamistus of Iberia.--A. D. 52. Tiridates I.--A. D. 60. Tigranes V. of the race of Herodes.--A. D. 62. Tiridates I. re-established by Nero, reigned about eleven years longer. B. The second or younger Branch, The second or younger branch, at first at Edessa, and sometimes identical with the " Reges Osrhoenenses," afterwards in Armenia Magna. B
ook advantage of the distracted state of the country to send his brother Tiridates into Armenia, and proclaim him king. Tiridates advanced upon Tigranocerta, took this city and Artaxata, and compelled Rhadamistus to fly. Rhadamistus was subsequently killed by his father Pharasmanes. (Tac. Ann. 12.44-51, 13.6, 37.) TIRIDATES I. The brother of Vologeses I., king of the Parthians, was driven out of Armenia by Corbulo, who appointed in his place Tigranes IV., the grandson of king Archelaus, A. D. 60. [TIGRANES IV.] Tiridates subsequently received the crown as a gift from Nero, A. D. 63. [ARSACES XXIII., TIRIDATES I.] Exedares ´╝łArdashes Iii.) An Arsacid (of the younger Armenian branch), was driven out by Chosroes or Khosrew, king of the Parthians. (D. C. 68.17.) According to Moses Chorenensis (2.44-57), Exedares, who is called Ardashes III., was a mighty prince, who humbled the armies of Domitian, but was finally driven out by Trajan. Chosroes placed on the throne in his stead Partha
iscrepancies between the statements of the Romans and those of the Armenians concerning this dynasty. The Romans tell us that Artaxias, governor of Armenia Magna for Antiochus the Great, king of Syria, made himself independent in his government B. C. 188; and that Zadriates became king of Armenia Minor, of which country he was praefect. The descendents of Artaxias became extinct with Tigranes III., who was driven out by Caius Caesar; and among the kings who reigned after him, there are many who fixed, and many points remain vague. The following is a series of the Arsacidae and other kings of Armenia according to the Romans. Artaxias I. praefect of Armenia Magna under Antiochus the Great, became the independent king of Armenia in B. C. 188. [ARTAXIAS I.] Tigranes I. the ally of Mithridates the Great against the Romans. [TIGRANES I.] Artavasdes I. the son of Tigranes I., taken prisoner by M. Antonius. [ARTAVASDES I.] Artaxias Ii. The son of Artavasdes I., killed by his re
DZRUNIANS said to have been descended from the ancient kings of Assyria. Several members of it were appointed governors of Armenia by the first khalifs. In A. D. 855, this family became independent in the northern part of Armenia in the country round the upper part of the Euphrates. Adom and Abusahl, the last Ardzrunians, were killed in 1080 by the emperor Nicephorus Botaniates, who united their dominions with the Byzantine empire. VIII. MOHAMMEDAN DYNASTIES. 1. Of Kurdish origin, from A. D. 984 to A. D. 1085. 2. Of Turkoman origin, from A. D. 1084 to A. D. 1312. They resided in different places, and the extent of their dominions varied according to the military success of the khalifs of Egypt and the Seljukian princes. IX. DYNASTIES OF DIFFERENT ORIGIN from the eleventh to the fourteenth century. Some kings belonged to the Pagratidae, among whom was the celebrated Haython I. or Hethum in 1224; and some were Latin princes, among whom was Leo VI. of Lusignan, who was driven out
some points from the preceding narrative, is taken from St. Martin, and is founded upon the Armenian histories of Moses Chorenensis and Faustus Byzantinus, compared with the Greek and Roman authors. A. The first or elder Branch in Armenia Magna. B. C. 149. Valarsaces or Wagharshag I., founder of the Armenian dynasty of the Arsacidae, established on the throne of Armenia by his brother, Mithridates Arsaces [ARSACES VI.] king of the Parthians. --B. C. 127. Arsaces or Arshag I., his son.--B. C. 114. Artaces, Artaxes, or Ardashes I., his son.--B. C. 89. Tigranes or Dikran I. (II.), his son.--B. C. 36. Artavasdes or Artawazt I., his son.--B. C. 30. Artaxes II., his son.--B. C. 20. Tigranes II., brother of Artaxes II.--B. C. .... Tigranes III.--B. C. 6. Artavasdes II.--B. C. 5. Tigranes III. reestablished.--B. C. 2. Erato, queen. A. D. 2. Ariobarzanes, a Parthian prince, established by the Romans.--A. D. 4. Artavasdes III. or Artabases, his Son.--A. D. 5. Erato re-established ; death
. Ann. 3.4.) Vonones Erato was deposed by the Armenians after a short reign, and the throne remained vacant for several years, till the Armenians at length chose Vonones as their king, the son of Phraates IV., and the exiled king of Parthia. (A. D. 16.) Vonones maintained himself but one year on the throne, as he was compelled to fly into Syria through fear of Artabanus III., the king of Parthia. [ARSACES XVIII.] ARTAXIAS III. chosen king, A. D. 18, about two years after Vonones had fled i. Tigranes III. reestablished.--B. C. 2. Erato, queen. A. D. 2. Ariobarzanes, a Parthian prince, established by the Romans.--A. D. 4. Artavasdes III. or Artabases, his Son.--A. D. 5. Erato re-established ; death uncertain.-- .... Interregnum.--A. D. 16. Vonones.--A. D. 17. Interregnum.--A. D. 18. Zeno of Pontus, surnamed Artaxias.--... Tigranes IV., son of Alexander Herodes.--A. D. 35. Arsaces II. --A. D. 35. Mithridates of Iberia.--A. D. 51. Rhadamistus of Iberia.--A. D. 52. Tiridates I.--A.
the Great in B. C. 328. The names of the fifty-nine kings, the duration of their reigns, and some other historical facts, mixed up with fabulous accounts, are given by the Armenian historians. II. SEVEN GOVERNORS Seven governors appointed by Alexander, and after his death by the Seleucidae, during the period from 328 to 149 B. C. III. DYNASTY OF THE ARSACIDAE From B. C. 149 to A. D. 428. See below. IV. PERSIAN GOVERNORS From A. D. 428 to 625. V. GREEK AND ARABIAN GOVERNORS from A. D. 632 to 855. VI. DYNASTY OF THE PAGRATIDAE from 855 to 1079. The Pagratidae, a noble family of Jewish origin, settled in Armenia in B. C. 600, according to the Armenian historians. They were one of the most powerful families in Armenia. After they had come to the throne, they sometimes were compelled to pay tribute to the khalifs and to the emperors of Constantinople, and in later times they lost a considerable part of Armenia. A branch of this family reigned at Kars for a considerable time
tes IV., and the exiled king of Parthia. (A. D. 16.) Vonones maintained himself but one year on the throne, as he was compelled to fly into Syria through fear of Artabanus III., the king of Parthia. [ARSACES XVIII.] ARTAXIAS III. chosen king, A. D. 18, about two years after Vonones had fled into Syria. [ARTAXIAS III.] Arsaces I. The eldest son of Artabanus, king of the Parthians, was placed on the throne of Armenia by his father, after the death of Artaxias III. He perished by the treacherto, queen. A. D. 2. Ariobarzanes, a Parthian prince, established by the Romans.--A. D. 4. Artavasdes III. or Artabases, his Son.--A. D. 5. Erato re-established ; death uncertain.-- .... Interregnum.--A. D. 16. Vonones.--A. D. 17. Interregnum.--A. D. 18. Zeno of Pontus, surnamed Artaxias.--... Tigranes IV., son of Alexander Herodes.--A. D. 35. Arsaces II. --A. D. 35. Mithridates of Iberia.--A. D. 51. Rhadamistus of Iberia.--A. D. 52. Tiridates I.--A. D. 60. Tigranes V. of the race of Herodes.--
89. Tigranes or Dikran I. (II.), his son.--B. C. 36. Artavasdes or Artawazt I., his son.--B. C. 30. Artaxes II., his son.--B. C. 20. Tigranes II., brother of Artaxes II.--B. C. .... Tigranes III.--B. C. 6. Artavasdes II.--B. C. 5. Tigranes III. reestablished.--B. C. 2. Erato, queen. A. D. 2. Ariobarzanes, a Parthian prince, established by the Romans.--A. D. 4. Artavasdes III. or Artabases, his Son.--A. D. 5. Erato re-established ; death uncertain.-- .... Interregnum.--A. D. 16. Vonones.--A. D. 17. Interregnum.--A. D. 18. Zeno of Pontus, surnamed Artaxias.--... Tigranes IV., son of Alexander Herodes.--A. D. 35. Arsaces II. --A. D. 35. Mithridates of Iberia.--A. D. 51. Rhadamistus of Iberia.--A. D. 52. Tiridates I.--A. D. 60. Tigranes V. of the race of Herodes.--A. D. 62. Tiridates I. re-established by Nero, reigned about eleven years longer. B. The second or younger Branch, The second or younger branch, at first at Edessa, and sometimes identical with the " Reges Osrhoenenses," af
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