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vĭdēlĭcet , adv. contr. from videre licet; cf. scilicet from scire licet; v. scilicet init.; prop. it is easy to see, to comprehend, serving, like scilicet, to confirm and complete what precedes (but with the difference that scilicet indicates rather the false, and videlicet the true explanation; v. Zumpt, Lat. Gram. § 345 n.); is easy to see, it is clear or evident, clearly, plainly, evidently, manifestly, etc. (class., but much less freq. than scilicet).
I. Lit.
A. In gen.
(α). With obj.-clause on account of videre (only ante- and post-class.; for in Cic. Att. 5, 11, 7, the better read. is datae): “videlicet, parcum illum fuisse senem, qui dixerit ... Videlicet fuisse illum nequam adulescentem, etc.,Plaut. Stich. 4, 1, 49 and 51: “esse videlicet in terris primordia rerum,Lucr. 1, 210: “sed videlicet, eum vocabula rerum ignoravisse,Gell. 17, 5, 9.—
B. In partic., it is easy to see, it is very plain, of course, forsooth, in an ironical or sarcastic sense, when the contrary is intended: “tuus videlicet salutaris consulatus, perniciosus meus,Cic. Phil. 2, 6, 15: “homo videlicet timidus et permodestus (Catilina) vocem consulis ferre non potuit,id. Cat. 2, 6, 12: “itaque censuit pecunias eorum publicandas, videlicet timens, ne, etc.,Sall. C. 52, 14.—
II. Transf., as a mere complementary or explanatory particle, to wit, namely (class.; “whereas scilicet in this sense is only post-Aug.): caste jubet lex adire ad deos, animo videlicet,Cic. Leg. 2, 10, 24: venisse tempus iis, qui in timore fuissent, conjuratos videlicet dicebat, ulciscendi se, id. Sest. 12, 28; cf. id. Rep. 1, 38, 60: “quale de Homero scribit Ennius, de quo videlicet saepissime vigilans solebat cogitare et loqui,id. ib. 6, 10, 10.
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