previous next
[131] Culloden because it had been placed on the left of the line of battle, and McDonald since Bannockburn had always held the right of the clans, they always were in front, whether posted there or not. They took it, and held it!

After Early was expelled from the valley by the overwhelming force of Sheridan, the Maryland Line cavalry and artillery were attached to Davidson's brigade, afterward commanded by Gen. Wm. L. Jackson. There they served in Lomax's cavalry division during the winter until March, 1865, when the remnant of Early's command was dispersed by Sheridan at Waynesboro. As Sheridan pursued Early across the mountains toward Richmond, the Marylanders hung on his flank and annoyed him as flies worry a horse, but could do no harm.

In the latter part of March, 1865, they were ordered to report to General Fitz Lee at Stony Creek. Reaching Richmond the evening of April 1st they camped there, and next day, Sunday, April 2d, saw the evacuation of the capital of the Confederacy. The Marylanders had then been reduced to less than one hundred. At Stony Creek they found General Lee had moved, and they received orders to cover the rear of Mahone's division, the rear guard of the army. On the 4th of April, Colonel Dorsey, commanding the First Maryland, joined Gen. Fitzhugh Lee and was assigned to Gen. Wm. H. Payne's brigade. General Payne was wounded at Amelia Springs and was succeeded by Gen. Thos. T. Munford. Under him, the Marylanders, like the McDonalds, always nearest the enemy, kept the enemy pursuing them in check. On the 9th of April a heavy force of the Federal cavalry was seen moving along Munford's front, parallel to it. Dorsey mounted his men and, pulling down a fence in his front, was moving through the gaps in it toward the enemy. As soon as his first section had passed through, they saw the Federals in full charge at them not a hundred yards off. ‘We must charge them,’ said Capt. William J. Raisin, ‘that's our only chance.’

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.

An XML version of this text is available for download, with the additional restriction that you offer Perseus any modifications you make. Perseus provides credit for all accepted changes, storing new additions in a versioning system.

hide Places (automatically extracted)

View a map of the most frequently mentioned places in this document.

Sort places alphabetically, as they appear on the page, by frequency
Click on a place to search for it in this document.
Stony Creek (Virginia, United States) (2)
Waynesborough (Georgia, United States) (1)
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (1)
Amelia Springs (Virginia, United States) (1)

Visualize the most frequently mentioned Pleiades ancient places in this text.

Download Pleiades ancient places geospacial dataset for this text.

hide People (automatically extracted)
Sort people alphabetically, as they appear on the page, by frequency
Click on a person to search for him/her in this document.
Philip Sheridan (3)
Early (3)
William H. Payne (2)
Thomas T. Munford (2)
Fitz Lee (2)
E. R. Dorsey (2)
William J. Raisin (1)
McDonald (1)
Mahone (1)
Lomax (1)
Fitzhugh Lee (1)
William L. Jackson (1)
Thomas H. Davidson (1)
hide Dates (automatically extracted)
Sort dates alphabetically, as they appear on the page, by frequency
Click on a date to search for it in this document.
March, 1865 AD (2)
April 9th (1)
April 4th (1)
April 2nd (1)
April 1st (1)
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: