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‘ [179] intercepted a dispatch from Dahlgren to Kilpatrick, asking what hour the latter had fixed for an attack on the city, so that both attacks might be simultaneous;’ and in his report the gallant South Carolinian complimented the Marylander for his gallantry in attacking the enemy at Beaver Dam, with a handful of men, and hanging on their rear, striking them continually, and never losing sight of them until they had passed Tunstall's station. Hampton further expressed his appreciation by presenting Johnson with a saber. This promptly won distinction as a cavalry leader he confirmed by his service against Merritt's division at Pollard's farm, and under Hampton at Trevilian's. June 25, 1864, he received his commission as brigadier-general and was assigned to the command of the cavalry brigade lately led by Gen. William E. Jones, killed at New Hope church. The service of this command under his gallant leadership is narrated in the preceding pages. His prime object in the Maryland campaign under Early was the release of the Confederate prisoners at Point Lookout, which had been discussed by General Lee and the President. Regarding the selection of a leader for this hazardous duty, General Lee had written the President: ‘It will be well he should be a Marylander, and of those connected with the army, I consider Col. Bradley T. Johnson the most suitable. He is bold and intelligent, ardent and true, and yet I am unable to say whether he possesses the requisite qualities. Everything in an expedition of this kind depends upon the leader.’ But he was fated not to be permitted to perform this service, being recalled after he made a detour around Baltimore to Beltsville by information from Early that the expedition was about to retire to Virginia. Later in July, 1864, he was associated with General McCausland in command of the expedition to Chambersburg, Pa., and as he occupied the place with his brigade it fell his lot to execute the orders of General Early to burn the town. Justifiable as it was, as a stern and righteous retribution

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