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[29]

36. the great bell Roland: suggested by the President's call for Volunteers.

by Theodore Tilton.
[Motley relates that the famous bell Roland of Ghent was an object of great affection to the people, because it always rang to arm them when liberty was in danger.]

I.
     Toll! Roland, toll!
--High in St. Bavon's tower,
     At midnight hour,
The great bell Roland spoke,
     And all who slept in Ghent awoke.
--What meant its iron stroke?
     Why caught each man his blade?
Why the hot haste he made?
     Why echoed every street
With tramp of thronging feet--
     All flying to the city's wall?
It was the call
     Known well to all,
That Freedom stood in peril of some foe:
     And even timid hearts grew bold
Whenever Roland tolled,
     And every hand a sword could hold;--
For men
     Were patriots then,
Three hundred years ago!

II.
     Toll! Roland, toll!
Bell never yet was hung,
     Between whose lips there swung
So true and brave a tongue!
     --If men be patriots still,
At thy first sound
     True hearts will bound,
Great souls will thrill--
     Then toll! and wake the test
In each man's breast,
     And let him stand confess'd!

III.
     Toll! Roland, toll!
--Not in St. Bavon's tower
     At midnight hour--
Nor by the Scheldt, nor far-off Zuyder Zee;
     But here — this side the sea!--
And here in broad, bright day!
     Toll! Roland, toll!
For not by night awaits
     A brave foe at the gates,
But Treason stalks abroad — inside!--at noon!
     Toll! Thy alarm is not too soon!
To Arms! Ring out the Leader's call!
     Re-echo it from East to West,
Till every dauntless breast
     Swell beneath plume and crest!
Toll! Roland, toll!
     Till swords from scabbards leap!
Toll! Roland, toll!
     --What tears can widows weep
Less bitter than when brave men fall?
     Toll Roland, toll!
Till cottager from cottage-wall
     Snatch pouch and powder-horn and gun--
The heritage of sire to son,
     Ere half of Freedom's work was done!
Toll! Roland, toll!
     Till son, in memory of his sire,
Once more shall load and fire!
     Toll! Roland, toll!
Till volunteers find out the art
     Of aiming at a traitor's heart!

IV.
     Toll! Roland, toll!
--St. Bavon's stately tower
     Stands to this hour,--
And by its side stands Freedom yet in Ghent;
     For when the bells now ring,
Men shout, “God save the King!”
     Until the air is rent!
--Amen!--So let it be;
     For a true king is he
Who keeps his people free.
     Toll! Roland, toll!
This side the sea!
     No longer they, but we,
Have now such need of thee!
     Toll! Roland, toll!
And let thy iron throat
     Ring out its warning note,
Till Freedom's perils be outbraved,
     And Freedom's flag, wherever waved,
Shall overshadow none enslaved!
     Toll! till from either ocean's strand,
Brave men shall clasp each other's hand,
     And shout, “God save our native land!”
--And love the land which God hath saved!
     Toll! Roland, toll!

--The Independent, April 18.

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