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[161] we should have had more frequent offerings. It is one of the delights of a friendship founded upon substantial grounds of respect, that nothing can alter it, and scarcely any distance sever it. The mind we love seems ever with us; and the very words our friend has uttered seem floating in the atmosphere, and want not a voice to make them more his own.

. . . Anne Procter is at Florence, attending the marriage of Mr. J. Parkes's niece, who is united to one of the Frescobaldis,—whose name, renowned in history, is well known to you; because you have read all the books that have been written, as I should think after the specimen I have had of your enormous memory. I hope you are getting rich as fast as possible, that you may retire from your profession and come to the old country, with old buildings and old books. . . . Do not cease to remember us; and, if by letter, I shall think it doubly kind.

In Lord Morpeth's note of November, 1840, there was a timely caution:—

I have to thank you for your most agreeable and thoroughly welcome letter from your own home. I cannot help being gratified that European, and especially English, recollections have not lost their hold upon you; but you must not let them exercise too great an influence upon either thought or action, or disable you from entering with freshness and energy upon whatever pursuit you have set before you. . . . God bless you! and be happy, and like what we knew you.

Americans visiting Europe found that he was well remembered by his English friends. Dr. Francis Wayland wrote, Feb. 8, 1841: ‘Both Kenyon and Ingham1 have made repeated inquiries after you, as well as every gentleman whom I have met, who had the pleasure of knowing you. It is my intention to return in the spring; and I shall go home loaded with messages of kindness and friendship for you.’

Edward Everett, while Minister to England, wrote, Aug. 11, 1843: ‘I often hear you spoken of with the greatest kindness,— particularly in the Carlisle and Sutherland families.’

Dr. Howe wrote, Aug. 2, 1843: ‘I have been again and again gratified, and my heart has thrilled with pleasure, at hearing the warm and affectionate expressions of regard which the mention of your name invariably draws out.’

Mrs. Waterston writes:—

When he returned from Europe I was married and living in Boston. His success in English and French society—a rare distinction then—made

1 Ingham wrote to Sumner: ‘The last [Dr. Wayland] I greatly admire. In all I saw of him when he was here, and in all I have read of his, there is an earnest, manly energy and truthfulness which win my confidence. He sees into his subject as a man whose eye is single.’

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