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No. 108.-report of Col. William B. Hazen, Forty-first Ohio Infantry, commanding Nineteenth Brigade.

Hdqrs. Nineteenth Brigade, Army of the Ohio, In Camp, near Pittsburg Landing, Tenn., April 9, 1862.
As commander of the Nineteenth Brigade I have to make the following report of its operations on the field April 7:

It being placed in position the night previous the men rested upon their arms, and at daylight were moved forward cautiously, covered by a strong party of skirmishers, who engaged those of the enemy. After advancing Ibout 1 mile, driving them before them about one-half mile, [341] where, coming upon two batteries of artillery and three or four regiments of infantry, the brigade was halted with the rest of the division, and the skirmishers directed to annoy the cannoneers. They pushed upon one of the batteries, driving away and killing the men. The enemy's infantry now poured a volley upon them, causing them to retire, with a small loss. The Ninth Indiana was immediately ordered forward, which they did in fine style, taking post behind a fence, and immediately engaged three rebel regiments, which were endeavoring to turn my right flank. By making a half change of front to the right I was in position much sooner than the enemy. The Sixth Kentucky was thrown forward, but did not gain a position to engage. The batteries of Captains Mendenhall and Bartlett now came up and engaged those of the enemy. His infantry was, after a smart engagement of about one hour, driven back and one of his batteries abandoned. It is proper here to say that the Ninth Indiana Volunteers, which lost one officer and several men in the morning's engagement, showed remarkable coolness and fortitude during the entire time. Several men of the other regiments were killed and wounded by stray shot.

The fighting now ceased for about one-half hour, excepting a partial engagement of the artillery. The enemy was now heard to be advancing upon our new front, and the brigade immediately put in motion to meet it. Firing commenced after advancing a few hundred yards, and was kept up incessantly, the enemy falling back before us for about three-fourths of a mile, where we found another line opposing us; also a battery of artillery, firing shell immediately in our front. We pushed directly up to the mouths of the guns, which were manned till the cannoneers were cut down by my men. The enemy were still pursued, when we were opened upon with grape from a battery on our left flank, creating considerable havoc. There being a large number disabled, the pursuit was here discontinued. The regiments were afterward reformed, and did service when they were needed.

The list of casualties is herewith appended ;1 it will be seen to be very large. I cannot withhold my earnest thanks for the able service rendered, as directed, by my entire command, and cannot refrain from calling particular attention to the gallantry shown by the Forty-first Ohio Volunteers. By the report it will be seen that they entered the fight with 371 commissioned officers and men. They left it with 229; there being 140 killed or wounded and but 2 missing. It had 4 color-bearers shot down, 2 being killed. Its advances and changes of front were made as accurately and unflinchingly us upon the drill ground. The casualties of the other regiments are conspicuously great. The track of the entire brigade showed the efficiency of its service. Quite a number of prisoners were taken and sent to the rear. My thanks are particularly due to Captains Mendenhall and Bartlett for the efficient service of their batteries; to Capt. J. M. Wright, staff of General Buell, for leading one of my regiments to the charge, and to Lieutenant Kimberly, my acting assistant adjutant-general, and Lieutenants Gaylord and Beebe,my aides-de-camp, for valuable assistance and daring on the field.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant

W . B. Hazen, Colonel Forty-first Ohio Vols., Comdg. Nineteenth Brigade. Capt. J. M. Kendrick, Assistant Adjutant-General, Fourth Division.


The following regimental officers displayed great valor under my immediate notice: Lieutenant-Colonel Blake, Ninth Indiana Volunteers; Capt. A. Wiley, Forty-first Ohio Volunteers, seized the flag of his regiment when the color-bearer had fallen, and was himself shot down, and Lieut. James McCleary, Forty-first Ohio Volunteers, taking it, had his right hand shot away.

1 Embodied in revised statement, p. 106.

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