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[331] compared with Longfellow's ‘Outre-Mer,’ 69-71.

Italy, 33, 50, 55, 65, 96, 142, 223.

Jamaica Plain, Mass., 146.

James, G. P. R., 237.

Janin, Jules, 161.

Jefferson, Thomas, 6.

Jewett, Sarah O., 198.

Johnson, Eastman, 272.

Jones, J. A., 23.

Jones, Sir, William, 43; his Letters, 42.

Joubert, J., his ‘Pensees,’ quoted, 235.

Keats, John, 280.

Kemble, Mrs., 200.

Kent, Duke of, 118.

Khayyam, Omar, 282.

Kiel, 108.

Kingsley, Rev., Charles, 237.

Knickerbocker,’ the, 140.

Korner, Charles Theodore, 64.

Kossuth, Louis, 173.

Lafayette, Marquis de, 52.

Lamartine, Alphonse M. L. de, 161.

Lawrence, Sir, Thomas, 207.

Lawton, William C., 234, 266; his ‘The New England Poets,’ cited, 234 note, 265 note.

Lenau, Nicholas, 161.

Leopold, King of the Belgiums, 195.

Lincoln, Abraham, 6.

Liston, Sir, Robert, 93.

Liszt, Abbe, 223.

Liverpool, Eng., 219.

Locke, John, 55.

Loire, the river, 49.

London, 2, 8, 87, 88, 91, 92, 103,105, 106, 170, 209, 210, 221, 223, 241, 245, 278.

Longfellow, Alexander W., 83, 129.

Longfellow, Alice M., 117 note, 209.

Longfellow, Fanny, 201.

Longfellow, Frances A., Longfellow's engagement to, 171, 172; appearance, 173; assists her husband, 173; her letter to Eliza Potter, 174, 175; death, 211.

Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth, birth of, 11; youth, 14-18; first poem on American subject, 17; college life, 18-20; shows American feeling in his Commencement oration, 21; early writings, 22; offers poems anonymously, 23; selections appear in Miscellaneous Poems, 23; his early poems compared with Bryant's, 24-26; one of his poems attributed to Bryant, 27; involuntary imitation of Bryant, 27; contributes articles in Irving's style, 27; letter to, from Jared Sparks, declining article, 29, 30; his ‘Our Native Writers,’ 30-36; graduates from Bowdoin, 37; literature his definite purpose, 37; writes to his father about his profession, 38-40, 41, 43; father's reply, 40, 41; first visit to Europe to prepare for Bowdoin professorship, 45; writes to his mother, 46, 47; enjoyment of France, 48-50; begins his studies in Germany, 51, 52; beginning of ‘Outre-Mer,’ 55; ‘Hyperion,’ 55; returns home, 56; becomes professor of modern languages at Bowdoin College, 56; prepares his own text-books, 57; contributes to the ‘North American Review,’ 58; publishes translations, 60; marries Mary S. Potter, 60; salary at Bowdoin, 64; life at Brunswick, 65, 66; writes to G. W. Greene, 67; publishes sketches in New England Magazine, 67; early sketches, 68; comparison of the Sketch Book and ‘Outre-Mer,’ 69-71; a puzzle about his writings, 72-74; his ‘Defence of Poetry,’ 75-80; project of taking the Round Hill School, 81, 82; position in regard to temperance, 83; his wife's letter about ‘Outre-Mer,’ 83; letter inviting him to become a professor at Harvard, 84, 85; his reply, 85-87; his first book, 87; second visit to Europe, 87-106; letter to his mother, 97, 98; his wife's illness and death, 107-111; buries himself in studies, 112; returns home, 113; his letter about his wife, 113-115; settles in Craigie House, 116; description of Mrs. Craigie, 118-120; interest in Craigie estate, 122, 123; his ‘Hyperion,’ 124-134; his letter to his wife's sister, 129, 130; on ‘Twice-Told Tales,’ 130-132; his desire for a national literature, 133; his best piece of prose, 135, 136; literary projects, 137; letter about ‘Hyperion,’ 139,140; criticisms of, 141-143; his relation with Bryant, 145,146; social side, 146,

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