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[189] of the northern channels, supported by another. On the night of the nineteenth of July an English steamer attempted to run in, and having eluded the hot pursuit of the outside blockade, no doubt indulged in the belief that all danger was past. But the gallant Captain Rodgers was in advance that night with the Catskill, and a shell sent suddenly by him ahead of the culprit steamer signified no escape. In despair or alarm the latter grounded on a shoal, and her wreck has since served as a warning to like evil-doers. Two or three steamers that were in managed to get out immediately after, and one or two may have gotten in, for the crews of the monitors were often too fatigued then with a day's battle to keep watch at night; but there ended the business as such, and for several months not a vessel has passed in or out.

These four monitors, who thus keep watch and ward, muster eight (8) guns and three hundred and twenty (320) men, which is almost insignificant in contrast with the work done.

I have thus put on paper the general impressions now uppermost, but very hastily and under great pressure of business, which will, I hope, excuse such imperfections as may have inadvertently occurred.

With more leisure I could do full justice to this interesting subject.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

Jno. A. Dahlgren, Rear-Admiral, commanding S. A. B. Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Sec. of Navy, Washington, D. C.


Additional report.

flag-steamer Philadelphia, off Morris Island, May 17, 1864.
Sir: I find that several omissions have occurred in my report to you on the iron-clads; they are handed to me just as the mail closes, and I have time only to request that they may be inserted in the report of January twenty-eighth, among the lists of actions then given, and also published in the Army and Navy Journal, which has published that report.

As my object was to show what the navy had done in this quarter, I am very glad to be able to extend the list. The loss of three fleet captains in succession--Captain Rodgers, killed in the Catskill, Captain Badger, wounded in an action with Moultrie, and Lieutenant Preston, taken prisoner in the assault on Sumter — necessarily deranged all the business of my command very much.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

John A. Dahlgren, Rear-Admiral, commanding S. A. B. Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy.

Additional list of actions in which the iron-clads were engaged with the rebel batteries in Charleston harbor while reducing Morris Island.

date.name.rounds fired.hits by enemy.distance.object.remarks.
1863.   Yards.  
July 18New Ironsides.80541,400Fort Wagner. 
July 20New Ironsides.168131,300Fort Wagner. 
August 23New Ironsides.904 Fort Wagner.Ship was under way; distance varied from 1,100 to 1,300 yards.
Sept. 2New Ironsides.4171,000Fort GreggHits from Gregg and Moultre; ship at anchor.
Sept. 2New Ironsides.9 1,500Fort Sumter. 
Sept. 5New Ironsides.488 1,300Fort Wagner. 
Sept. 5New Ironsides.3211,800Fort GreggHit from Gregg.

On July twenty-ninth the Passaic engaged Wagner, and on August thirty-first Moultrie. On September eighth the Passaic, (in a disabled condition,) Patapsco, Weehawken, and Nahant engaged Moultrie.

I have the honor to be,

Very respectfully,

Your obedient servant,

John A. Dahlgren, Rear-Admiral, commanding S. A. B. Squadron.


Report of Commodore S. C. Rowan.

United States steamer New Ironsides, off Morris Island, May 13, 1864.
Sir: In obedience to your order of the twelfth instant, I enclose herewith a tabular statement of various actions of this ship with the rebel fortifications of Charleston harbor, and

Have the honor to be, very respectfully,

Your obedient servant,

S. C. Rowan, Commodore, commanding. Rear-Admiral John A. Dahlgren, Commanding S. A. B. Squadron, Flag-Steamer Philad.

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